Texting While Driving Essay

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Texting While Driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 826

  • Pages: 3

Texting While Driving

While the ability to communicate away from our homes or work has become a vital tool to connect with family, friends, and emergency management agencies, it has also evolved into a tool of great danger when used while operating vehicle, particularly texting while driving. Texting while driving has become as dangerous to driver and passenger safety as are people driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance.

The number of teens killed because of texting while driving has now surpassed the number killed while driving under the influence of alcohol according to Alcohol Problems and Solutions. The website notes that, “Driving a vehicle while texting is six times more dangerous Than driving while intoxicated,” according to The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

In a Centers for Disease Control survey conducted on texting while driving, 69% of people owning a cell phone admitted to texting while driving within the 30 days prior to the survey, (CDC). If texting while driving were punishable by law, 69% of all drivers owning a cell phone would be committing a crime. There needs to be strict laws passed in every state that are strictly enforced by law enforcement. Mississippi is one of only nine states that does not have full bans on texting while driving according to a report from MDOT on distracted driving, documented on WLBT Channel 3 News. In states where full texting while driving bans are enforce, the rate of accidents and fatalities has decreased significantly such as in Syracuse, New York where they experienced a 32% decrease in cell phone use and texting (NHTSA). In Hartford, Connecticut they saw a 57% drop in handheld cell phone use and a 72% drop in texting while driving (NHTSA). With these new statistics, NHTSA is planning to expand its campaign to ban cell phone use while driving in a nationwide effort as documented in the journal released in The State of the Nation of Cellphone Distracted Driving from the National Safety Council as posted on their website.

In an article titled, Texting While Driving, found in Issues and Controversies, critics Argue that bans placed on texting while driving are pointless and it is not something easily enforced. The critics believe that it would be easy to mistaken a person simply looking down for someone texting while driving. The supporters of bans on texting while driving feel that the danger is not to the driver that is texting, but to the innocent drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. They believe that the potential danger is equal to that of a drunk driver or someone driving under the influence of a controlled substance.

Some alternative solutions could be used instead of full bans on cell phone use while operating a motor vehicle, but few of them offer any real safety measure. It would be possible to write a ban that prohibits cell phone use while driving only and not when at stop signs or red lights for example. However from my own personal experience, particularly being a passenger riding with my husband, even using cell phones while stopped causes safety risks and distractions on the roadway. As a passenger I am usually the one hollering the light is green or there is a car behind us, because he is delayed in his response to the change in the flow of traffic from pausing to use his cell phone. If you are distracted at all while driving you cannot react in a timely manner to the things unfolding around you. For example, if an ambulance or other emergency vehicle needs to pass and you are zoned out, because you are texting at a stop light, then someone needing emergency assistance would delayed in getting the help needed.

It all comes down to driver responsibility. If drivers cannot act responsibly behind the wheel then other measures have to be taken such as new laws put in place to protect the innocent people from the irresponsible drivers on the road. If there is anything people are doing to cause a distraction to themselves or another driver, then there should be fines, penalties, and punishments that hold drivers accountable for their actions on the roadways at all times.

Works Cited
The National Highway Traffic Safety Commission Site. Alcohol Problems and Solutions, 2013. Web. 23 Oct. 2013.

Centers for Disease Control Site, www.cdc.gov, 2013.

WLBT Channel 3 News Site, MDOT Distracted Driving, 2013
Web. 17 Apr. 2013.

National Safety Council Site, The State of the Nation, Cellphone Distracted Driving, 2013 Web. n.d. 2013

Drew Evans personal driving experience used for field research.

Issues and Controversies, Texting While Driving, 2010
Web. 11 Oct. 2010

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Texting While Driving Essay

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Texting While Driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1870

  • Pages: 7

Texting While Driving

Texting while driving is one of the most common causes of accidents on roads. This is because texting while driving results in physical, visual and cognitive distraction. It greatly increases the amount of time a driver spends not looking at the road. It is a very serious distraction that can cost you your life or the lives of other people.

According to recent research by Queensland’s RACQ, using a mobile phone in general can relay reaction time as much as having a blood alcohol content of 0.08% which is well over the legal limit of 0.05% in Australia. It reduces your reaction time by 35%, even when using hands-free, so texting is obviously going to be even worse because you are effectively driving blind for however long you look at your phone. In fact, every second you spend texting, you double your chances of being in a crash, so why take the chance?

If you are ever driving a car and are about to send a text message or use your phone, think about how important it really is. Is it really worth risking your life to tell someone “lunch was nice” or “I’ll be home soon”? Is it worth leaving a child fatherless and asking questions like “Mum, who will look after me if you go to heaven like dad?” as was the case for 5 year-old Harry Stortz after his Dad Jason was killed by an under-age, unlicensed texting driver? Harry will never get to see his Dad again just so someone could make arrangements to pick a girl up and go to his mate’s house. This is just one horrible example of the vast number of deaths caused by texting while driving.

We are all disgusted by drink driving, and for good reason, and using a mobile while driving has been proven in many studies to be just as bad, if not worse. Despite this, around 40% of drivers between 18-24 routinely admit to sending or reading texts while driving. This shows that there is an urgent need for greater fines and punishments for drivers who use their mobiles while driving.

Texting while driving is one of the most common causes of accidents on roads. This is because texting while driving results in physical, visual and cognitive distraction. It greatly increases the amount of time a driver spends not looking at the road. It is a very serious distraction that can cost you your life or the lives of other people.

According to recent research by Queensland’s RACQ, using a mobile phone in general can relay reaction time as much as having a blood alcohol content of 0.08% which is well over the legal limit of 0.05% in Australia. It reduces your reaction time by 35%, even when using hands-free, so texting is obviously going to be even worse because you are effectively driving blind for however long you look at your phone. In fact, every second you spend texting, you double your chances of being in a crash, so why take the chance?

If you are ever driving a car and are about to send a text message or use your phone, think about how important it really is. Is it really worth risking your life to tell someone “lunch was nice” or “I’ll be home soon”? Is it worth leaving a child fatherless and asking questions like “Mum, who will look after me if you go to heaven like dad?” as was the case for 5 year-old Harry Stortz after his Dad Jason was killed by an under-age, unlicensed texting driver? Harry will never get to see his Dad again just so someone could make arrangements to pick a girl up and go to his mate’s house. This is just one horrible example of the vast number of deaths caused by texting while driving.

We are all disgusted by drink driving, and for good reason, and using a mobile while driving has been proven in many studies to be just as bad, if not worse. Despite this, around 40% of drivers between 18-24 routinely admit to sending or reading texts while driving. This shows that there is an urgent need for greater fines and punishments for drivers who use their mobiles while driving. Texting while driving is one of the most common causes of accidents on roads. This is because texting while driving results in physical, visual and cognitive distraction. It greatly increases the amount of time a driver spends not looking at the road. It is a very serious distraction that can cost you your life or the lives of other people.

According to recent research by Queensland’s RACQ, using a mobile phone in general can relay reaction time as much as having a blood alcohol content of 0.08% which is well over the legal limit of 0.05% in Australia. It reduces your reaction time by 35%, even when using hands-free, so texting is obviously going to be even worse because you are effectively driving blind for however long you look at your phone. In fact, every second you spend texting, you double your chances of being in a crash, so why take the chance?

If you are ever driving a car and are about to send a text message or use your phone, think about how important it really is. Is it really worth risking your life to tell someone “lunch was nice” or “I’ll be home soon”? Is it worth leaving a child fatherless and asking questions like “Mum, who will look after me if you go to heaven like dad?” as was the case for 5 year-old Harry Stortz after his Dad Jason was killed by an under-age, unlicensed texting driver? Harry will never get to see his Dad again just so someone could make arrangements to pick a girl up and go to his mate’s house. This is just one horrible example of the vast number of deaths caused by texting while driving.

We are all disgusted by drink driving, and for good reason, and using a mobile while driving has been proven in many studies to be just as bad, if not worse. Despite this, around 40% of drivers between 18-24 routinely admit to sending or reading texts while driving. This shows that there is an urgent need for greater fines and punishments for drivers who use their mobiles while driving. Texting while driving is one of the most common causes of accidents on roads. This is because texting while driving results in physical, visual and cognitive distraction. It greatly increases the amount of time a driver spends not looking at the road. It is a very serious distraction that can cost you your life or the lives of other people.

According to recent research by Queensland’s RACQ, using a mobile phone in general can relay reaction time as much as having a blood alcohol content of 0.08% which is well over the legal limit of 0.05% in Australia. It reduces your reaction time by 35%, even when using hands-free, so texting is obviously going to be even worse because you are effectively driving blind for however long you look at your phone. In fact, every second you spend texting, you double your chances of being in a crash, so why take the chance?

If you are ever driving a car and are about to send a text message or use your phone, think about how important it really is. Is it really worth risking your life to tell someone “lunch was nice” or “I’ll be home soon”? Is it worth leaving a child fatherless and asking questions like “Mum, who will look after me if you go to heaven like dad?” as was the case for 5 year-old Harry Stortz after his Dad Jason was killed by an under-age, unlicensed texting driver? Harry will never get to see his Dad again just so someone could make arrangements to pick a girl up and go to his mate’s house. This is just one horrible example of the vast number of deaths caused by texting while driving.

We are all disgusted by drink driving, and for good reason, and using a mobile while driving has been proven in many studies to be just as bad, if not worse. Despite this, around 40% of drivers between 18-24 routinely admit to sending or reading texts while driving. This shows that there is an urgent need for greater fines and punishments for drivers who use their mobiles while driving. Texting while driving is one of the most common causes of accidents on roads. This is because texting while driving results in physical, visual and cognitive distraction. It greatly increases the amount of time a driver spends not looking at the road. It is a very serious distraction that can cost you your life or the lives of other people.

According to recent research by Queensland’s RACQ, using a mobile phone in general can relay reaction time as much as having a blood alcohol content of 0.08% which is well over the legal limit of 0.05% in Australia. It reduces your reaction time by 35%, even when using hands-free, so texting is obviously going to be even worse because you are effectively driving blind for however long you look at your phone. In fact, every second you spend texting, you double your chances of being in a crash, so why take the chance?

If you are ever driving a car and are about to send a text message or use your phone, think about how important it really is. Is it really worth risking your life to tell someone “lunch was nice” or “I’ll be home soon”? Is it worth leaving a child fatherless and asking questions like “Mum, who will look after me if you go to heaven like dad?” as was the case for 5 year-old Harry Stortz after his Dad Jason was killed by an under-age, unlicensed texting driver? Harry will never get to see his Dad again just so someone could make arrangements to pick a girl up and go to his mate’s house. This is just one horrible example of the vast number of deaths caused by texting while driving.

We are all disgusted by drink driving, and for good reason, and using a mobile while driving has been proven in many studies to be just as bad, if not worse. Despite this, around 40% of drivers between 18-24 routinely admit to sending or reading texts while driving. This shows that there is an urgent need for greater fines and punishments for drivers who use their mobiles while driving.

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Texting While Driving Essay

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Texting While Driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1501

  • Pages: 6

Texting While Driving

Texting while driving didn’t become a global issue overnight, but quickly, one fatality after the next, led to alarming statistics that cannot continue to go ignored, and while some families are asking for justice, that could never replace the loved ones they’ve lost. Others are demanding a solution to the growing epidemic. In the United States alone, “over 6,000 deaths and half a million injuries are caused by distracted drivers each year.” (Edgar Snyder and Associates, 2013). Cellphone usage has been identified as the number one distraction. Is there a real solution to this issue? The answer is yes, but it will require continued efforts from manufacturers, law enforcements, along with the drivers themselves before this issue can be solved, diminishing the economical, social, and political disturbances it has stirred up in the past decade.

Our phones have become smarter, thanks to innovators like Steve Jobs and his contributions to technological advancements during his leadership with Apple, while he was still alive. Not only did he predict the needs of individuals before they knew the need existed, but as he designed each Apple iPhone he brought consumers one step closer to safety. These electronic devices are so intelligent and sensitive, that the voice of a human can be used to perform commands that are directed towards them without touching the device. As mentioned earlier, phones still pose as a threat to drivers, even with this new technology, simply because they remain a distraction and not every cell phone user is utilizing their phone to its full potential. This is where law enforcement must come in to play their small part in restricting cellphone usage while driving.

Already in the state of Georgia, texting while driving is illegal and those caught doing so will be ticketed and fined, and possibly face jail time for committing this crime. It may sound too petty to be punishable, but the innocent act of texting behind the wheel has taken many innocent lives. A shocking statistic states that “driving a vehicle while texting is six times more dangerous than driving while intoxicated” (Alcohol Problems and Solutions, 2012). Texters should be aware of this and fulfill their obligation of protecting the safety of others while driving.

Law enforcement and those in politics have a responsibility of making sure that those texting while driving are caught in their actions and punished accordingly. Those politicians in power that have the ability to enforce laws in the other states that have not yet made it illegal to text and drive, like Florida, for example should see to it that their power is used to do so. In the end, the life that they may be saving might just be their very own. Even more alarming than the texting while driving statistics is the fact that the majority of drivers are guilty of this crime, and most drivers feel that they are in control of the wheel and aren’t a threat to other drivers or pedestrians, forgetting that it only take a split second for disaster to strike.

In one split second a person’s like can be flipped upside down, and taken away from them. It should never be because of a hand held device. Every new driver and those renewing their licenses should be required to attend a one hour texting while driving seminar where they will learn about the harsh consequences that often comes about as a result of texting while driving. The class will not only present statistics, but drivers will get the opportunity to see visual aids of fatalities caused across the United States as a result of the growing epidemic. Those attending this seminar should be required to take a post-exam showing that they’ve understood the material that was presented to them and that the importance thereof. Though some may forget what they learned at these seminars, a few good, law abiding citizens will remember what they’ve learned, and they will help to make a difference.

The proposed solutions of making smarter cell phones, making it illegal to text and drive in all states, along with making it mandatory to attend a live seminar before being awarded a driver’s license or renewal, will begin to prove effective once law enforcement begin to really buckle down and do their jobs, not to say that they aren’t doing their jobs, but lives are still being lost daily from texting while driving and everyone has a small responsibility here to simply make things right. It will prove to be advantageous to everyone in the long run.

There are economical advantages associated with solving the texting while driving dilemma. The first advantage was mentioned earlier, and that is, insurance companies won’t have to pay out millions annually to cover the cost of accidents. Just so, those surviving these accidents won’t have to pay higher premiums anymore, since the chances of them having an accident will decrease if they would simply put down their cellphones, connect it to the Bluetooth, and simply drive without holding or looking at their phone. If a call needs to be placed, most of the newer model cars have become “smart” cars, where the driver can simply ask the car to dial out to someone in their contact list, and the individual’s voice will come through the car’s speakers. This is far safer than holding a phone to the ear while driving.

There are social advantages of solving the texting while driving dilemma and perhaps most will agree that one advantage is allowing more intimate family moments. Studies have brought to light the fact that Americans spend more time at work and on the road than they do at home, and this has contributed to a plethora of other issues in their lives. Some of these issues include bad eating habits and failed family relationships due to lack of direct interaction. Not only are people texting while driving, but to keep up, they are eating on the go, as well as a few other things, just to save time.

If America can just slow down and dedicate themselves to more disciplined lifestyles, texting while driving will not be a necessity at all. Today everyone wants to keep up with their social lives, the latest trends, and the latest gossip. As extreme as it may sound, if texting while driving is reduced by way of any of the earlier posed solutions, families will have more to sit and talk about around the dinner table, creating more intimate moments. Everyone truly must play their part in solving this issue. The blame is not to be placed on the careless driver alone; even politicians play a part in this.

Faith in politics has to be restored, and until the politicians who are in power play their small part in bringing justice to families that have lost loved ones to cell phone accidents, they will continue to lose respect from citizens. It is the citizens who put these politicians in power, and when their voices are in turn, not heard, many citizens turn away from voting, and we all know how important it is to vote. The best way for faith in politics to be restored is by having more politicians involved with raising funds to bring awareness to drivers about the dangers of using hand held devices while driving. Also, to date, only 11 states have enforced texting while driving laws, which means that governors and other law enforcements in 39 states haven’t felt the need as yet to put their feet down about the issue. Perhaps they themselves are busy texting while driving.

There are more people and companies against texting while driving than there are those who are blind to the issue, insurance companies are fed-up with the huge pay outs and families are weary of crying and weeping over loved ones. How many more lives will have to be taken before this issue is under control? It’s time for our smart phones to become even smarter, for laws to be enforced, and for drivers to become more responsible. The simple solutions to this epidemic can help to make America a safer place. The time for this change, is now.

References
Alcohol Problems and Solutions, (2013). Driving While Texting Six Times More Dangerous Than Driving While Drunk. Retrieved from: http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/files/Driving-while-Texting-Six-Times-More-Dangerous-than-Driving-while-Drunk.html Snyder,E., & Associates, (2013). Cell Phone and Texting Accident Statistics. Retrieved from: http://www.edgarsnyder.com/car-accident/cell-phone/cell-phone-statistics.html Lissy, K., Cohen, J., Park, M., & Graham, J. (2000,July) . Cellular Phone

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Texting While Driving Essay

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Texting While Driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 306

  • Pages: 1

Texting While Driving

About 41% of teen reported that they had texted or emailed while driving. This is true even though there are horrifying commercials and campaigns aimed at keeping teen drivers’ eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. Also, the bulk of teen deaths are due to motor vehicle crashes. But texting and driving isn’t the only risky business teens are engaging in. About 41.3% of teens said they’re using computers for more than 3 hours daily. About 14.8% of students said that they had been bullied online.

Another risk that is that sexually active teens are having more unprotected sex that in the past: around 41% of sexually active teens. The annual survey of 9th through 12th graders examines the unhealthy behaviors of teens over the past 12 months is what is used to gage the leads to unintentional injury, obesity, and unplanned pregnancies. About 13,500 surveys, which were administered at public and private high schools, were examined to determine results.

It is sad to see the number of teens partaking in risky behaviors rise even though statistics show how many teens are ruining their lives. Schools are now even showing videos of the consequences of partaking in these behaviors and videos of people that tell how the consequences aren’t worth the short term enjoyment. I want to know the mentality of teens that text while driving because judging by their actions, it seems like they value replying to a text more than their own lives. It’s unbelievable how teens still text and drive even though they know that they could die at any moment. Either teens need to change their ways or parents need to start intervening to save their children from becoming victims to risky behaviors.

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Texting While Driving Essay

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Texting While Driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 807

  • Pages: 3

Texting While Driving

“Despite the dangers of texting while driving, many behind the wheel just can’t seem to stop. One idea from Apple could put up more of a roadblock. Published on Tuesday by the US Patent and Trademark Office, an Apple patent called “driver handheld computing lock out” proposes a couple of different ways to cut off texting and other cell phone features while a person is driving. In one scenario, Apple’s technology would work on its own by detecting the motion of the driver and/or analyzing the surrounding scenery. The motion detector would use the phone’s onboard sensors to tell if the car is moving beyond a certain speed. The scenery analyzer would use the phone’s camera to determine if the phone is being held by the driver. If a red flag goes up, a lock-out mechanism would then automatically disable texting and other functions of the phone. In a second scenario, a persons car would essentially tell their phone when it’s time to be quiet. After they would start their car, someone’s ignition key would send a signal to their phone to disable texting and other features.

The first scenario sounds more complicated but may be more doable as it would rely solely on technology built into the phone. The second scenario sounds simpler but would require the involvement of automakers. Either way, a patent filing doesn’t mean the technology will ever hit the real world. Still, Apple is trying to integrate itself more into your automobile as evidenced by its Car Play system. Technology that specifically focuses on the dangers of distracted driving would be an ideal next step.” (Herzog) Although this new apple product might be very effective, there are also so many other factors at play in this dangerous topic. For instance, the social problem while texting and driving is becoming a huge issue for American drivers, and, consequently, for the American people as a whole.

People are becoming too distracted by their cell phone rather than focusing on driving down the road. One of the problems is that people are being hurt and killed because someone chose to pick up their phone and send a text instead of watching the road. Because of this, there are new measures being taken. Actually, there is a law being placed in Florida. Starting in October, the law will ban texting while driving. There needs to be more of a persistence to attempt banning texting while driving so that this problem will not occur as much. The problem needs to be stopped for the safety of the drivers and the people around them. Perhaps there will be fewer deaths and driving will become safer for the American people.

However, the gap between reality and the ideal world is much bigger than we would like it to be. In the ideal world, everyone would follow the law. In reality, people break laws and sometimes get away with it. The texting while driving issue will continue on, even if it becomes illegal in America. There will be fewer people texting while driving, but it will never stop because it is reality, and there are some people that just don’t care. Laws alone may not be able to fill this gap. There may be a need for some outside motivation. Yet, as we have it, the problem still remains.

In this problem, a significant portion of the population in America are becoming involved in defining a solution for this issue. For example, the majority of the people in America would rather have texting and driving illegal than legal. They care about their safety and the people around them. The population of the people in America that are seeking to ban texting and driving should show the law enforcers that this is a problem and should be illegal. Yet, law enforcers are not the only ones with the power to change things. Every American citizen has the ability to vote to change things. Therefore, people should use whatever platforms they have to persuade others to vote to ban texting while driving.

One would hope there would be a final conclusion to this problem. Yet, the conclusion may be that people texting while driving will always be a problem because that is reality. Maybe someday it will be illegal everywhere in America so that we all could feel safer. This is still a huge social issue in America. For now, maybe one of the best answers is that we ourselves make sure to keep our eyes fixed on the road and not on the phone.

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Texting while driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 474

  • Pages: 2

Texting while driving

Is it really that important to stay connected during every hour of the day? Many drivers today have such busy lives and never have time to complete the things they need to do in one day’s time. This leaves them to get things done while on the road. Checking texts and social media is a top priority for Americans and since many have smartphones, they will do it on the road. There are many laws being established to try to prevent distracted driving from happening, although they can’t completely stop it. No matter what age the driver is, under no circumstance should they be texting while driving. Texting or using a cell phone while driving is very hazardous to yourself and the people surrounding you. One reason the majority of people are against this action is because it causes a great amount of car accidents every year. While driving, adults and teenagers cannot resist the urge to pick up their cell phone and send a text or respond to one.

When the driver hears their phone nothing can stop them from checking the notification on their phone. As soon as the driver’s eyes meet their phone, their focus on the road is drawn away. The lives of innocent people are being taken every day due to a simple distraction. Car crashes are four times more common to take place while the driver is on their mobile device over any other causes. Most people don’t seem to realize how careless they can be while driving a car. Talking on a cell phone is not as dangerous as texting these days. While talking on the phone, it is easier to still keep focused on the road in front of the driver. When they engage in a text message, it’s not possible to look in both directions at once; therefore all of their focus goes straight to the screen of the cell phone. It’s hard for all drivers, especially teenagers, to put down the cell phone and put their hands on the wheel, which results in many car crashes.

According to a survey taken by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 52% of drivers on the road today feel at risk when driving compared to five years ago. One year before, only 40% were said to feel unsafe, having a 17% increase from year to year. Not only are distracted drivers harming themselves, yet they are putting every other driver on the road in the same dangerous position without realizing it. Texting while driving puts many drivers’ lives in danger daily. It can harm others on the roads that are doing nothing other than trying to make it to where they’re going safely.

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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 913

  • Pages: 4

Texting While Driving

How many people text behind the wheel of their vehicle? Can we relate to the following story? Jaci Lemons* is driving down the street, headed to school. The 17 year old driver is texting another friend. As she looks down to read the incoming text, Jaci veers off to the right and crashes head-on into the back of a parked vehicle. She is taken to the hospital, but after brief examination by the attending ER doctor, Jaci is released. Thankfully, the only thing bruised is her pride, and her pocketbook. Missouri should make texting while driving illegal for all drivers, not just the drivers aged 21 and under.

Missouri has passed a state law, on Aug. 28, 2009, that prohibits drivers 21 years of age or younger from sending or reading a text while driving. While that is a great start, it isn’t enough. Drivers across the country have been seen in their vehicles doing all sorts of dangerous, weird, and downright strange things while driving. Watching a DVD movie (really), dressing, putting on makeup, eating, texting, etc; but texting is what is causing legislatures some concern here in Missouri. The problem is we spend so many hours behind the wheel that seemingly, we are driving on “auto pilot”. (Have you ever driven a while and then could not remember any of it?)

“Young people will be forced to at least keep their fingers off their keyboards while they drive,”said Leanna Depue, director of Highway Safety or the Missouri Department of Transportation. “The law is a small step toward counteracting some of the distracted driving that causes crashes in Missouri.” And, according to a recent study by Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, texting while driving is the leading cause of traffic crashes in Missouri, as well as across the country. 80% of crashes involve driver distraction; mainly that texting is the number one thing that distracts motorists’ attention while driving. Half of all teen drivers say they text while driving. HALF. It’s almost unthinkable to realize so many drivers don’t have their eyes on the road. Couple that with the sobering fact that most cars on America’s roadways are traveling approximately 65 to 70 miles per hour.

According to the St. Louis Post Dispatch, statistics show that “teenagers have the most problems texting while they are driving, probably because they text more than anyone else and send longer texts than their adult contemporaries. Some teens can very easily burn through a thousand minutes of texting in no time”. Twenty-three other states, along with Missouri, have already made texting while driving illegal. While texting while driving a car should not be legal in any case, the law in Missouri allows drivers over the age of 21 to text while they are driving. Motorists in some states are allowed to use a cell phone while they drive, as long as it’s hands-free. Most states already have laws against talking on the cellphone and driving; however, what doesn’t make any common sense at all is allowing those over the age of 21 to text and drive while banning those under 21 to do so.

Take for instance, 38 year-old Donald Rios*. One afternoon, while traveling to another town, he was texting a co-worker about picking up some 4 by 6’s for their job site. In the meantime, traffic was slowing because a farmer was burning his fields next to the interstate. Donald Rios looked up to see that traffic was nearly at a standstill, and he could not stop in time. He rear-ended the back of another vehicle, and in turn, a semi rear-ended him, causing his truck to cave in like an accordion.

Subsequently, Rios lost his life in the accident…all because of his inattentiveness to the road ahead. Legislation encouraging laws which ban texting have also been encouraged at the federal level with proposals suggesting that any state who didn’t ban texting could risk losing federal highway funding. Missouri is the 23rd state to ban texting while driving, but is 1 of 9 to single out a particular age group. The fine for texting while driving under Missouri’s new law is $200. Senator Ryan McKenna sponsored the bill.

An insurance industry study has revealed that accidents increased in 3 of 4 states that has laws prohibiting texting while driving. The study, prepared by Highway Loss Data Institute, says it looked at accident statistics from insurance claims in four states that have made it illegal for motorists of any age to text while driving, as well as nine states with no, or limited bans; in three states, accidents increased dramatically after the bans passed. Those were California, Louisiana and Minnesota .

So, how does law enforcement actually catch you texting while driving? How can they tell if you were texting if you don’t have the phone in plain view? Here’s how: If your phone is destroyed in an accident, the phone company has a log of all texts and calls, which are also logged with the exact date and time. Phone companies keep a log of text histories just like a computer does of websites and pages. Please don’t text (or do other distracted hazards) and drive. Your life, as well as others’ lives depends on it.

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Texting While Driving Essay

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Texting While Driving Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 688

  • Pages: 3

Texting While Driving

Many consider that texting while driving can be very dangerous.They say that roads aren’t safe when driver’s text and drive. But in reality there wouldn’t be a difference in roads if the ban of texting while driving was enacted. In my opinion I don’t think texting while driving should be banned. I disagree with the whole concept of it. Banning texting while driving would be pointless, hard to enforce, and it isn’t the cause of increase in car accidents.

One reason why texting while driving shouldn’t be banned is because it would be pointless. Drivers don’t only get distracted only by texting, but by many other things. As Balko stated in his article “There are countless other driver distractions that we’d never think of banning, from having kids in the back seat, to eating or drinking while driving to fumbling with the radio.” (Balko) The little things that people do while operating a vehicle can be more distracting than what people can imagine. Anything can happen on the roads when driving and at any time. Drivers would have to be more cautious when driving.

Another reason why I disagree with the ban of texting while driving is because it isn’t possible to enforce this. In the article “Cities disagree on texting-driving ban” Ms. Gaff says “they ask ‘How can we enforce this?’” (Swartsell) Police officers will not know when a driver is texting. If banned, officers will just be given another reason to stop people. (Radley) They can’t just assume that drivers that are looking down are texting. This wouldn’t be fair to drivers. It wouldn’t make sense to be stopped based on an assumption an officer makes.

Last, the increase on car accidents has nothing to do with texting while driving. In the article “Should Text Messaging While Driving Be Banned? No.” Radley states “Overall reported accidents since 1997 have dropped, too, from 6.7 million to 6 million.”Prople text and drive everyday and car accidents still decrease. Car accidents can happen depending on anything the driver is doing and or is focused on. Yes, some accidents may happen because of texting but it’s not a solid reason as to why it should be banned. Driver would just have to be more careful while texting and driving.

Now I am aware as to why they would want to ban texting while driving. Car accidents that are done due to texting can be as frightening as to a drunken driving accident. Technology is taking over society, which causes so much agreement as to why they should ban texting while driving. But if they were to ban texting while driving, how does that guarantee anything to drivers? This would be exactly why I disagree with banning texting while driving. There would be no type of guarantee that if they ban this we’ll be safer.

In the article “Should Text Messaging While Driving Be Banned? Yes.” McCarthy states “With the same fervor I had when I was first sworn into office in 1997, I seek common ground on issues I believe will make our country stronger and safer each and every day.” This doesn’t make me feel safe in no type of way. They are promising something to us that they have no control of. There would be no difference if texting while driving is banned or not.

Pointless, hard to enforce and not causing the increase on car accidents are all reason why they shouldn’t ban texting while driving. There is no way anyone can make us feel safer if they ban texting while driving. That isn’t the only reason why car accidents are caused. So what if they ban texting while driving? I think there would be no difference.

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