Principles of Safeguarding and protection in Health and Social Care Essay

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Principles of Safeguarding and protection in Health and Social Care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 2742

  • Pages: 11

Principles of Safeguarding and protection in Health and Social Care

1. Knowing how to recognise signs of abuse
1.1. Define the different types of abuse

There are many different types of abuse that are usually classifed in 5 main headings. These include: Physical
Physical abuse is the act of a person making contact with someone to intentionally caus pain, harm or injury Sexual
Sexual abuse is forcing sexual contact or bhaviour, towards a person who doesnt give consent. In some cases people are deemed unable to consent due to age or mental health.

Psychological
Psychological abuse is where a person is subjected to mentally stressing situations whic causes motional distress. Abusive realationships are a prime example of psychological abuse where there is an imbalance of power and the abuser has control. Finanical

Finanical abuse is where an indvidual tries to take control or gain access to anothers finanances illegally and without the persons consent. Institutional
Institutional abuse is the mistreatment of a person within a care environment. Usually due to lack of staff training and unacceptable standards of service. Self – neglect
Self – neglect is where a person does not care for their basic needs, such as their basic hygine. People who self – neglect regularlly put themselves at risk of harm or place themselves in dangerous situations. Neglect by others

Neglect is where a person responsible for the care needs of another fails to meet their needs. This is usually because they do not relise the importance of giving the care that is needed or they choose not to.

1.2. Identify the signs and symptoms associated with each type of abuse.

Physical
The potential signs for physical abuse can include:
Fractures and dislocation
multiple bruising in well-protected areas of the body
scratches or cut
pressure ulcers, sores or rashes
black eyes or bruising to ears
welt marks
scalds or cigarette burns
a history of falls, injuries or a history of accidental overdose unable to provide an explanation consistant to their injuries clinical intervention without any clear benefit to the person deteriouration of health without an obvious cause

loss of weight
inappropriate, inadequate or soiled clothing
withdrawal or mood changes
carer’s resistance to allow people to visit
reluctanc to be left alone with the alleged abuser
Sexual
The physical signs of sexual abuse are
bruises, scratched, burns or bite marks to the body
scratches, abrasions or persistent infections in the genital regions pregnancy
recurrant genital or urinary infections
blood or marks on underwear
abdominal pains with no diagnosabl cause
As well as the physical signs their can also be behavioural signs which act as an indicator of sexual abuse, these can include: provocative sexual behaviour or promiscuity
prostitution
sexual abuse of others
self-injury or self-distructive behaviour such as alcohol and drug abuse or repeated suicide attempts. behaviour that invites further exploitation
disappearing from a home environment
aggression, anxiety or fearfulness
reluctance to be left alone with the alleged abuser
frequent masterbation
refusal to undress for activities such as swimming or bathing Psychological
The potential indicators for psychological abuse can include: refusal to be left alone with the alleged abuser
carer seems to ignore the person’s needs and presence
reports from neighbours of shouting, screaming and swearing
Fearful of raised voices, distressed if they feel their in trouble a culture of teasing or taunting which causes distress and humiliation the carer refers to the cared for person in a derogatory way no valuing of basic human rights cared for person being treated like a child

Financial
The signs and symptoms that are associated with financial abuse can include: very few or no personal possessions
unusual change in spending pattern
unexplained shortage of money
unexplained disappearance of possessions
family regularly asking for money from the persons allowance family unwilling to pay from person’s funds for services they get person not made aware of financial matters
enduring power of attorney set up without consulting a doctor where the person is already confused other people taking over person’s property
person not being allowed to manage their own financial affairs sudden changes of a will
Institutional
There are many signs and symptoms of institutional abuse but the key factor to identifying it, is that the abuse is accepted or ignored by the care organisation. Examples of this are: complaints procedures are deliberately made unavailable

access to advice and advocacy is restricted or not allowed
excessive or inappropriate doses of sedation or medication are given the setting is run for the convenience of the staff
privacy and dignity are not respected
freedom to go out is limited by the institution
refused choices over day-to-day decisions such as mealtimes, bedtimes, what to wear or use the toilet Self-neglect
The signs and symptoms of self-neglect can sometimes be hard to recognise as it could be that the person has decided on this lifestyle choice and is happy to live this way. These situations are difficult to make decisions and a balance must be achieved to ensure we don’t remove a person’s ability to choose how they live yet safeguarding and protecting vunerable people. The signs to watch for can include: becoming ill regularly

loss of weight
being dirty and unwashed
wearing soiled clothing
an unclean living environment
withdrawal from sociaty
Neglect by others
The signs and symptoms of neglect by others are similar to self-neglect but the person relies on others for their care. For example not given adequate food or given assistance to eat
doesn’t get support with personal care and fails to maintain a clean living environment being left alone
not supporting communication needs or aiding with mobility
failing to maintain medical or health care needs
not supporting social contacts

1.3. Describe the factors that may contribute to an individual being more vulenerable to abuse.

Every individual is open to abuse and there are many risk factors that can make a person more vulenerable to abuse. However a person may still be abused when no obvious factors are present. Some factors that are known to contribute to the risk of abuse are: poor communication between the person and their carer

challenging behaviour by the cared for person
young or immature carers
carers feeling unable to carry on or strong feelings of frustration person and their carer have a history of a troubled relationship carer having an alcohol or drug dependancy
carer believing that the person is being deliberately difficult or ungrateful carer not taking on the roll of carer willingly and had to make big lifestyle changes carer having more than one care responsibilities

person being violent towards carer
carer having disturbed sleep
both person and carer being socially isolated
financial or housing pressures
delays to provide support
no family support or contact

2. Know how to respond to suspected or alleged abuse.
2.1.Explain the actions to take if there are suspicions that an individual is being abused.

If you suspect an individual of being abused it is important that you speak to the individual and allow them to be open with you. Listen to the individual and do not judge their word. Try to establish what it is that has occurred without asking any leading questions. Reassure the individual that they are being taken seriously and that you will help them to make it stop. Ensure that the facts are recorded on the appeopriate paperwork and is signed and dated; making sure to report the incident to a senior member of staff.

2.2 Explain the actions to take if an individual alleges that they are being abused.

When an individual speaks out about abuse it is important to take the allegations seriously. Reassure them that they can tell you everything and you’ll do everything in your power to help it stop. Make a written account of what has been said making sure to include only the facts and not your own opinions. Sign and date the paperwork and report it to senior members of staff for them to take the matter further.

2.3 Identify ways to ensure that evidence of abuse is preserved.

to record the facts immediately making sure to sign and date the paperwork record any physical signs of abuse using a body map, try to describe the injuries size, shape and colour try not to tamper with any evidence unless you have to for the wellbeing of the individual if you have to touch anything, record what you have done

report the evidence to senior members of staff immediately

3. Understand the national and local context of safeguarding and protection from abuse 3.1 Identify national policies and local systems that relate to safeguarding and protection from abuse.

Both nationally and locally the protection of vulnerable adults forms part of the safeguarding adults agenda. Local boards are responsible for delivering a multi-based agency to respond to the safeguarding of adults. They are also responsible for conducting Serious Case Reviews when someone has died as a result of abuse. Nationally there are legislations that provide the basis for dealing with vulnerable adults that are being abused. Such as the Care Standards Act 2000, Safe guarding vulnerable groups act 2006 and the Mental healt act 1983.

3.2 Explain the roles of different agencies in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse.

Many different agencies are responsible for safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse this is to ensure that abuse if easyer to be found, recorded and report to the right authorities. These agencies include: Medical professionals such as GP, hospital staff, nurses, docors etc. They can examine, diagnose & treat abuse, they will record all evidence including photographic evidence. An Expert Witness such as paediatris, geriatrics, psychiatrics etc can report evidence of abuse The local authority would carry out an assessment of needs, through social workers. This would assess the risks of abuse for the individual The Safeguarding Team, within Social Services investigates & ensures safety and will work with other agencies such as police.

A Safeguarding & Protection Officer would lead the Adult Protection Alert. The Police will investigate and prosecute abusive cases, they will work with other agencies, to provide support to victims and raise awareness of abuse. Care Quality Commission regulate & inspect care providers, ensuring that safeguarding policies are being adhered to. Independent care homes, following safeguarding policies, to safeguard & protect vulnerable people before employment commences, including CRB checks

3.3 Identify reports into serious failures to protect individuals from abuse.

The biggest example of failures to protect individuals from abuse would be the report by the Care Quality Commission on the services provided at Winterbourne View. Despite a senior nurse alerting the care home’s management and the CQC on several occasions about cases of abuse, his concerns were failed to be followed up. CQC inspectors found that the home had failed to ensure people under the care of Winterbourne View were adequately protected from risk CQC also added that the home failed to meet standards required by law such as: managers did not report majors incidents to the CQC

planning and delivery of care did not meet individual needs they did not have robust systems to assess and monitor the quality of services they have not responded to, or considered complains about the service investigation into the conduct of staff was not robust and didn’t safeguard individuals they didn’t take steps to identify the risks of abuse or to avoid abuse happening they ignored allegations of abuse and did not respond appropriatly they did not have steps in place to protect individuals from abuse used exessive use of restrait

staff were inexperienced and untrained to deal with the individuals in their care

3.4 Identify sourses of information and advise about own role in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse.

There are many ways to access information on safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse such as national polices and proceedures, individual care plans, local authorities polices and proceedures, training in areas such as safeguarding and information from management.

4. Understanding ways to reduce the likelihood of abuse.
4.1 Explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced by:
working with person centered values
encouraging active participation
promoting choices and rights

Ensuring that the individual maintains the right to make choices for themselves. That they are confident and have a vision of self worth to help individuals feel less vulnerable towards abuse. Understanding that they have a choice to be heard and knowing that they can share anything and that information will be taken seriously will reduce the likelihood of abuse taking place. Active participation builts self esteem, refusing to tolerate abuse and be more likely to report it.

4.2 Explain the importance of an accessable complaints proceedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse.

When the complaints proceedure is clear and easily accessable an indivdual is more likely to report an incident of abuse and abusers will be more likely be investigated on their behaviour. Knowing this would make them less likely to abuse. Individuals that are vulnerable to abuse will feel protected and empowered to report any incidences of abuse.

5. Know how to recognise and report unsafe practices
5.1 Describe unsafe practices that may affect the well-being of individuals.

In a care setting unsafe practies that affect the well-being of individuals
could include:
Staff shortages
Staff feel pressured to cut corners due to lack of time and for example may not wait to ensure that medication has been taken properly Staff are unsure of the individual’s correct needs and then don’t deliver the right care the individual needs Lack of training for all staff could lead to poor moving and handling of an individual Inexperienced staff in a senior role

Lack of correct equipment or equipment is broken or unavailable puts the individual act risk of harm

5.2 Explain the actions to take if unsafe practices have been identified

Staying in line with policies and proceedures we have to ensure that the safety of the individual is protected and away from any risks. Report everything to senior management and write down what is suspected and why on appropriate paperwork and try to preserve the evidence of the practices without endangering others.

5.3 Describe the action to take if suspected abuse or unsafe practices have been reported but nothing has been done in response.

If nothing has been done in response to reporting to a senior member of staff, the deputy manager or home manager should be informed. If again noting happens the local safeguarding authorities such as council, police or other agencies should be contacted to invested the matter further. The CQC should also be contact about the matter. Keeping all information that has been reported written down with times and dates of the unsafe practices,when they orginally reported and to who you reported it to.

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in Health and Social Care Essay

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in Health and Social Care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 814

  • Pages: 3

Principles of safeguarding and protection in Health and Social Care

This assignment aims to support the Learner to acquire knowledge and understanding of the knowledge evidence requirement for unit, and to guide the learner towards gathering evidence to demonstrate their competence for this unit. Having acquired the knowledge the Learner needs to demonstrate to their assessor they understand the knowledge requirement and can apply this in their work practice. All knowledge evidence should be related to the expectations and requirements of the Learners job role.

Aim:

The aim of this assignment is to enable the learner to acquire knowledge and understanding of recognising signs and symptoms of the different types of abuse and what to do in the event of suspected or alleged abuse making sure aware of the correct procedures and guidelines that are in place to protect the individuals from danger, harm and abuse.

Abuse is a complex area and there can be pitfalls in having separate categories. An individual may be subjected to different types of abuse which display the same signs and symptoms. Alternatively, one “type” of abuse does not take place alone e.g. sexual abuse also has emotional and physical components. “Abuse is the violation of an individual’s human and civil rights by any other person or persons” (Department of Health “No Secrets” 2000) “Abuse can be described as the mistreatment of a person which results in suffering and distress. It can be a single incident or part of a repeated pattern, as a result of a conscious act, or neglect by the abuser”. (Nursing Standard Nov 1995)

Guided Learning Hours: 22

Learner Name
Hayley Woods

Date

Know how to recognise signs of abuse.

Know how to respond to suspected or alleged abuse.

Understand the national and local context of safeguarding and protection from abuse.

Understand ways to reduce the likelihood of abuse.

Know how to recognise and report unsafe practices.
Define the following types of abuse and the signs and/or symptoms associated with each type of abuse:

• physical abuse: – injuries that are shapes of objects or injuries that havent had medical attention – dehydration or unexplained weight changes or if medication is going missing – change of behaviour for example being afraid of someone or avoiding that person

• sexual abuse: – STD’s or pregnacy
– bruises in genital/anal areas
– signs of changing body image for example – self-harm anorexia, bulimia • emotional/psychological abuse: – Not being able to talk to the adult on their own – low self-esteem, anxiety or lack or confidence

– Feeling like they are being watched all the time
– increased levels of urinary or faecal incontinence or increased levels of confusion

• financial abuse:

• institutional abuse:

• self-neglect:

• neglect by others:

Describe factors that may contribute to an individual being more vulnerable to abuse.

Explain the actions to take if there are suspicions that an individual is being abused?

Explain the actions to take if an individual alleges that they are being abused?

Identify ways to ensure that evidence of abuse is preserved?

Identify national policies and local systems that relate to safeguarding and protection from abuse and explain the roles of different agencies in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse.

Identify reports into serious failures to protect individuals from abuse and give a brief description of the failing and what has been changed to protect vulnerable adults?

Identify sources of information and advice about own role in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse.

Explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced
by:
working with person-centred values, encouraging active participation, promoting choice and rights?

Explain the importance of an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse.
Describe unsafe practices that may affect the well-being of individuals and explain the actions to take if unsafe practices have been identified?

Describe the action to take if suspected abuse or unsafe practices have been reported but nothing has been done in response?

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care Essay

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1634

  • Pages: 7

Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care

Task A Booklet

Create a booklet about safeguarding, which can be used as a reminder for people who work in the care profession.

The booklet must:
Ai Describe in your own words what is meant by the following types of abuse:

• Physical abuse – Body harm.
Bruising, fear…

• Sexual abuse – Forcing sexual behaviour.
Bruising around genital areas, fear from p/care…

• Emotional/psychological abuse –Verbal abuse to maintain power and control, taking empowerment away from an individual. Fear of guving opinions or speaking out loud…

• Financial abuse –Taking money or making somebody financially dependant. Money keep on disappearing from a wallet.

• Institutional abuse – Setting unflexible time frames
Having a strict schedule for diferent timings.

• Self neglect – Not taking care of ones needs by themself. Poor hygiene, dirty clothes…

• Neglect by others – Needs being unattended to by people that could support & assist. Malnutrition, poor hygiene…

Aii Identify signs and symptoms of the different types of abuse Aiii Explain the correct actions to take if you suspect an individual is being abused If an individual is suspected of being abused, I should inform my superior and keep an eye out for any possible developments, try to bring the subject up in conversation with the individual in a sensitive & respectful way. Aiv Explain the correct actions to take if an individual tells you they are being abused Listen calmly and patiently, try to comfort them, inform the manager of the home of what is going on, call the care workers & the police.

Av Identify how to ensure that any evidence of abuse is kept safe Make an accurate written record of any conversations that are relevant between the service user & I, ensure written records are in a safe place, body map any kind of bruising or injuries, try to keep it all as it was until police investigators arrive Avi Identify the national policies that set out requirements for safeguarding individuals. the ADSS-led national, ‘Safeguarding Adults’ network

Avii Identify the local and organisational systems for safeguarding Our Isle of Wight government is committed to the protection of any adult at risk of abuse as a high priority. Aviii Explain the roles of different agencies and professionals that are involved in safeguarding individuals Police, criminal (assault, fraud, theft, domestic violence)

Council, to protect people using their service – make sure they’re safe. Extend help where needed to support those experiencing abuse and neglect in their own homes Social Workers, To investigate actual or suspected abuse or neglect CRB, to check an individuals past to see if they have any criminal convictions. I as a care worker to support the individual.

Aix Identify sources of advice, support and information to help social care workers understand their own role in safeguarding Our company safeguarding file in the care office National charity working to protect and prevent the abuse of vulnerable older adults: Action on –Elder Abuse National helpline offering advice and support to vulnerable people who have experienced crime or abuse: Voice UK A range of information, advice, advocacy, and practical help services for older people:

Age Concern Southwark Support and advice for people living with a learning disability: Mencap Free and confidential help for victims of crime, witnesses and their family or friends: Victim Support Help for people with Down’s syndrome to live full and rewarding live: Downs Syndrome Association National charity providing services and support to deafblind people: Deafblind UK

Task B Research and Account
Identify two reports on serious failures to protect individuals from abuse.
Write an account that describes the unsafe practices in the reviews.

Abuse can happen anywhere anytime, but especially to vulnerable people, ie Children, elderly people, people with disabilities, people with learning difficulties. It can even happen in places people should be safe, ie hospitals, residential/ nursing homes, schools, daycare/ nurseries, centres etc. I researched two cases reported for abuse. The Winterbourne case which was nationally reported, and a local abuse case of East Sussex (Child G), the Winterbourne case was more of a physical an emotional abuse, whilst that Child Gs case was of sexual abuse of a child under 16 and abduction. The Winterbourne case was reported nationally because it was such a disgusting mistreatment of vulnerable people, 11 members of staff were caught on cctv after visitors and patients complained about mistreatments.

The evidence that was captured showed physical abuse such as, slapping, poking eyes, pulling hair, even as unbelievable as trapping them under chairs, and soaking residents in freezing cold water. It also showed emotional and verbal abuse in the form of name calling. This was an inhumane mistreatment of vulnerable individuals, the effective and humane delivery of assessments and treatments was not provided. The report which is published finds that Castlebeck Care Ltd (Teesdale) was not compliant with 10 of the essential standards which the law requires providers must meet. CQC’s findings can be found below. The managers did not ensure that major incidents were reported to the Care Quality Commission as required. Planning and delivery of care did not meet people’s individual needs.

They did not have robust systems to assess and monitor the quality of services. They did not identify, and manage, risks relating to the health, welfare and safety of patients. They had not responded to or considered complaints and views of people about the service. Investigations into the conduct of staff were not robust and had not safeguarded people. They did not take reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent it before it occurred. They did not respond appropriately to allegations of abuse.

They did not have arrangements in place to protect the people against unlawful or excessive use of restraint. They did not operate effective recruitment procedures or take appropriate steps in relation to persons who were not fit to work in care settings. They failed in their responsibilities to provide appropriate training and supervision to staff.

The centre was closed after NHS and local commissioners had found alternative locations for the clients acting in their best interest, there was a failure to report any of these incedents, staff that were not involved in the abuse should have reported it, knowledge about a crime and not doing anything about it is just as being a criminal yourself. The other report I identified was of a young 15 year old girl in East Sussex named as child G, she was abducted by her teacher Mr K in 2012, with whom she had been maintaining a sexual relationship with since around her 15 birthday, identifies serious concerns relating to school’s actions, including: failure to identify the abuse and exploitation of Child G;

fixed thinking; failure to hear concerns raised by students; failure to involve Child G’s mother; insufficient recognition of Mr K’s inappropriate use of Twitter to communicate with Child G; and serious concerns with the ways in which information was recorded, stored, retrieved and provided for the review. Identifies procedural failings in police handling of allegations relating to inappropriate images of Mr K on Child G’s phone. Makes various interagency and single agency recommendations covering: East Sussex Local Safeguarding Children Board, children’s services, school and police services. Mr K was found guilty of abduction and admitted a number of charges of sexual activity with a child under 16-years; he received a custodial sentence of 5-and-a-half-years.

Task C – Short Answer Questions

Ci Explain what a social care worker must do if they become aware of unsafe practice. Explain the correct way of practicing safely or directly whistleblow. Cii Describe what a social care worker must do if unsafe practice is reported but nothing is done to ensure it is corrected. Inform again about the issue not being mended, if nothing is still done, it would have to be reported. Ciii Describe three factors that may make individuals more vulnerable to abuse than others.

Age

Mental capacity
Difficulty to be able to protect themselves from abuse

Civ Explain how adopting a person centred approach which offers choices and upholds rights can empower an individual and help to reduce the likelihood of abuse. An empowered person is somebody that is not scared of expressing themselves, they are more likely to give there opinion and refuse or confront if there is any abuse directed to them. Cv Explain how encouraging and promoting active participation can help to reduce the likelihood of abuse. An individual by themselves is more prone to abuse, it is an easier victim, would have nobody to turn to for support or to confide in, nobody would really keep a close eye on somebody they don’t really have close. Cvi Explain how an effective and easy to use complaints procedure can help to reduce the likelihood of abuse. It makes it easier for the home and the care provider to be able to act fast and try to get a solution for any issue.

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care Essay

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 2784

  • Pages: 11

Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care

1.1 Define the following types of abuse:

•Physical abuse involving contact intended to cause feelings of intimidation, injury, or other physical suffering or bodily harm.

•Sexual abuse is the forcing of undesired sexual behaviour by one person upon another.

see more:identify sources of information and advice about own role in safeguarding

•Emotional/psychological abuse may involve threats or actions to cause mental or physical harm; humiliation; isolation.

•Financial abuse is the illegal or unauthorised use of a person’s property, money, pension book or other valuables.

•Institutional abuse involves failure of an organisation to provide appropriate and professional individual services to vulnerable people. It can be seen or detected in processes, attitudes and behaviour that amount to discrimination through unwitting prejudice, ignorance, thoughtlessness, stereotyping and rigid systems.

•Self-neglect is a behavioural condition in which an individual neglects to attend to their basic needs, such as personal hygiene, appropriate clothing, feeding, or tending appropriately to any medical conditions they have.

•Neglect is a passive form of abuse in which the perpetrator is responsible to provide care, for someone, who is unable to care for oneself, but fails to provide adequate care to meet their needs. Neglect may include failing to provide sufficient supervision, nourishment, medical care or other needs.

1.2Identify the signs and/or symptoms associated with each type of abuse:

•Physical abuse when you have Bruises, pressure marks, broken bones, abrasions, and burns may indicate physical abuse or neglect.

•Sexual abuse can be bruises around the breasts or genital area, as well as unexplained bleeding around the genital area, pregnancy, STI’s may be signs of sexual abuse.

•Emotional/psychological abuse can be unexplained withdrawal from normal activities, changes in behaviour and unusual depression may be indicators of emotional abuse.

•Financial abuse can be no money, food, clothes. Large withdrawals of money from the bank account, sudden changes in a will, and the sudden disappearance of valuable items may be indications of financial exploitation.

•Institutional abuse can include poor care standards; lack of positive responses to complex needs; rigid routines; inadequate staffing and an insufficient knowledge base within the service; lack of choice, individuality.

•Self neglect can be bedsores, poor hygiene, unsanitary living conditions, and unattended medical needs may be signs of neglect.

•Neglect by others can be failure to take necessary medicines, leaving a burning stove unattended, poor hygiene, confusion, unexplained weight loss, and dehydration may all be signs of self-neglect.

1.3 Describe factors that may contribute to an individual being more vulnerable to abuse: If an individual is not mobile, is confused, has dementia, or is aggressive or challenging then this can increase the risk of abuse as the carer might not know how to deal with this, get frustrated and might take it personally and abuse the individual.

2.1 Explain the actions to take if there are suspicions that an individual is being abused: If I suspected any kind of abuse I will record the facts on appropriate paperwork and let my manager know.

2.2 Explain the actions to take if an individual alleges that they are being abused: If an individual alleges that they are being abused, I will record the detail of all allegations that the individual tells me using the individual’s own words, I will not ask any questions or make any judgements about what I have been told. I will take the allegations seriously and reassure the individual that they are right to tell me as their safety is the most important. I will make sure that I record the date and time when the abuse was report it to the manager.

2.3 Identify ways to ensure that evidence of abuse is preserved: •Record the facts immediately
•Report immediately
•Do not tamper with evidence

3.1 Identify national policies and local systems that relate to safeguarding and protection from abuse: •National policies – Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006, the Vetting and Barring Scheme run by the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA), Criminal Records Bureau, Human Rights Act 1998. •Local Systems – Safeguarding Adults Boards, Safeguarding policies and procedures for vulnerable adults.’

3.2 Explain the roles of different agencies in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse:

Safeguarding Adults Boards Role:
The overall objective of the board is to enhance the quality of life of the vulnerable adults who are at risk of abuse and to progressively improve the services of those in need of protection The Police Role:

Serving the community, respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons. CRC Role:
We monitor, inspect and regulate services to make sure they meet fundamental standards of quality and safety and we publish what we find, including performance ratings to help people choose care.

3.3 Identify reports into serious failures to protect individuals from abuse:

•October 2013: Police have arrested 7 care workers from the Veilstone Care
Home in Bideford in Devon over alleged abuse of people with learning disabilities. •February 2011: Julie Hayden was designated safeguarding champion for the London Borough of Hounslow’s older people’s team at the time the thefts were reported, but failed to follow correct safeguarding procedures in either case.

•August 2012: The serious case review into events at Winterbourne View, near Bristol, comes after 11 ex-staff members admitted offences against patients

3.4 Identify sources of information and advice about own role in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse: You can obtain information from Care Quality Commission, Local authority Adult Services Department like Social Services and Independent Safeguarding Authority. Can get advice on own role from my manager, care workers and my company’s policies and procedures on safeguarding from the office.

4.1 Explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced by:
Working with person centred values:
Person-centred values include the individuality of the person, the rights of the individual, the individual’s choice, the individual’s privacy, the individual’s independence, the individual’s dignity and the individual being respected. Encouraging active participation:

Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient. Promoting choice and rights:

Individuals are supported to make their choices in anything they want like in choosing food or drink, in what to wear, whether to use hot or cold water to bathe. No individual will choose what will hurt him or her therefore abuse is reduced to the minimum. Individuals’ rights are promoted throughout the service. My service user has the right to do anything that they wish to do and if it is what they want as long as it is not dangerous; a risk assessment is then done to stop any abuse happening.

4.2 Explain the importance of an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse:

•The complaints procedure gives the complainant the right to be heard and supported to make their views known. An accessible complaints procedure is understandable and easy to use. It sets out clearly how to make a complaint, the steps that will be taken when the complaint is looked into. It also provides flexibility in relation to target response times.

•An accessible complaints procedure resolves complaints more quickly as the complainant feels that they are being listened to and their complaint taken seriously. This sets up an open culture of making sure that abuse will not be tolerated in any form and encourages the complainant to not accept this.

5.1 Describe unsafe practices that may affect the wellbeing of individuals: •Unsanitary conditions can spread infection as cross-contamination can occur and can affect the well-being of the individual and others. •Dirty kitchen surfaces and equipment can spread infections. •Improper hand washing can also pose a risk.

•Staff not recording in care plans about a service user’s wellbeing and health and not monitoring them. •Staff not checking when a service user is ill or unsteady on their feet. •In terms of health and safety not having risk assessments in place when a service user hurts themselves. •leaving a service user on the toilet too long, ignoring or not listening to them.

5.2 Explain the actions to take if unsafe practices have been identified: If I identify unsafe practices, I must follow the whistle-blowing procedure and immediately report to my manager or if it involves my manager then to another appropriate person.

5.3 Describe the action to take if suspected abuse or unsafe practices have been reported but nothing has been done in response: •If suspected abuse or unsafe practices have been reported but nothing has been done in response or if it has to do with my manager then I will report to the next level or manager. •If it has to do with my manager then I will report to management, then to the social worker and safeguarding team and to the care quality commission and even to the police depending on the response I get.

Principles of communication in adult social care settings.

1.1 Identify different reasons why people communicate?
•expressing and sharing ideas, feelings, needs, wishes and preferences •obtaining and receiving information
•getting to know each other

1.2 Explain how effective communication effects all aspects of working in adult social care settings? •service provision
•teamwork
•participation, support and trust
•empathy and shared understanding
•recording and reporting

1.3 Explain why it is important to observe an individual’s reactions when communicating with them

•to understand what an individual is trying to express
•to meet the individual’s needs
•to identify any changes in an individual’s needs
•to enable effective communication

2.1 Explain why it is important to find out an individual’s communication and language needs, wishes and preferences

An individual is someone requiring care or support

Preferences may be based on:
•beliefs
•values
•culture

Importance of finding out an individual’s needs, wishes and preferences may include:

to enable effective communication
•to understand what an individual is trying to express
•to understand an individuals’ needs, wishes, beliefs, values and culture •to avoid the individual feeling excluded
•to avoid the individual becoming distressed, frustrated or frightened •to support the individual to be fully involved in their daily life

2.2 Describe a range of communication methods

Communication methods include:

Non-verbal communication:
•written words
•facial expressions
•eye contact
•touch
•physical gestures
•body language
•behaviour
•gestures
•visual aids e.g. flash cards, pictures, symbols

Verbal communication:
•vocabulary
•linguistic tone
•pitch

3.1 Identify barriers to communication

Barriers may include:
•not understanding or being aware of an individual’s needs, wishes, beliefs, values and culture •not making communication aids available or checking they are working

•a noisy environment
•an uncomfortable environment e.g. lighting, temperature •a lack of

privacy
•different language, use of jargon

3.2 Describe ways to reduce barriers to communication

Ways to reduce barriers may include:
•understanding and being aware of an individual’s needs, wishes, beliefs, values and culture •supporting individuals to communicate their needs
•avoiding using jargon in written documents and when speaking •speaking slowly and clearly
•ensuring communication aids are available and working properly •showing you are listening and interested
•providing a quiet and private environment
•making sure the environment is comfortable

3.3 Describe ways to check that communication has been understood

Ways to check may include:
•observing the person you are communicating with
•‘reading’ facial expressions and body language
•checking with the individual that they have understood
•asking questions, re-phrasing
•consulting others

3.4 Identify sources of information and support or services to enable more effective communication

Sources of information and support may include:
•individual’s care plan
•individual’s communication profile
•individual’s communication passport
•individual themselves
•colleagues
•key worker
•translator
•interpreter
•speech and language therapist
•advocate
•family or carers

Services may include:
•translation services
•interpreting services
•speech and language services
•advocacy services

4.1 Define the term “confidentiality”

Meaning of confidentiality may include:
•keeping information private and safe
•passing on private information with the individual’s permission •only passing on information to others who have a right to it and need to know it

4.2 Describe ways to maintain confidentiality in day to day communication

Ways of maintaining confidentiality may include:
•keeping written records safe
•not leaving written records in places where others might see •ensuring confidential information is passed on only to others who have a right to it and who need to know it
•password protecting electronic files
•checking the identity of the person before passing on information •not discussing personal information about individuals outside of work •providing a private environment

4.3 Describe situations where information normally considered to be confidential might need to be shared with agreed others

Situations may include:
•when working with others
•when a criminal act has taken place
•when an individual or another person is at risk of danger, harm or abuse •when an individual or another person is being placed in danger, harmed or abused
Agreed others may include:
•colleagues
•social worker
•occupational therapist
•GP
•speech and language therapist
•physiotherapist
•pharmacist
•nurse
•specialist nurse
•psychologist
•psychiatrist
•advocate
•dementia care advisor
•family or carers

4.4 Explain how and when to seek advice about confidentiality

How to seek advice may include :
•the organisation’s confidentiality policy
•speaking with the manager

When to seek advice may include when:
•confidential information needs to be shared with agreed others •clarification is needed

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care Essay

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Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 2713

  • Pages: 11

Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social care

1. Define the following types of abuse:

a. Physical abuse
Physical abuse can include: hitting, slapping, pushing, pinching, force feeding, kicking, burning, scalding, misuse of medication or restraint, catheterisation for the convenience of staff, inappropriate sanctions, a carer causing illness or injury to someone in order to gain attention for themselves ( this might be associated with a condition called fabricated and induced illness ).

see more:explain how a clear complaints procedure reduces the likelihood of abuse

b. Sexual abuse
Sexual abuse includes: rape and sexual assault, masturbation, indecent exposure, penetration or attempted penetration of intimate areas, sexual harassment, involving a vulnerable adult in pornography, enforced witnessing of sexual acts or sexual media, participation in sexual acts to which the vulnerable adult has not consented or could not consent or was pressured into consenting.

c. Emotional / psychological abuse
The emotional and psychological abuse includes: bullying, threats of harm or abandonment, ignoring, shouting, swearing, deprivation of contact with others, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, harassment, verbal abuse, deprivation of privacy or dignity, lack of mental stimulation.

d. Financial abuse
Financial abuse can include: theft, fraud, exploitation, pressure in connection with wills, property, inheritance or financial transactions, the misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits.

e. Institutional abuse
The key factor in identifying institutional abuse is that the abuse is accepted or ignored by the organisation, or that it happens because an organisation has systems and processes that are designed for its own benefit and not those of the people using the service. For example: People in residential settings are not given choice over day-to-day decisions such as mealtimes or bedtimes. Freedom to go out is limited by the institution

Privacy and dignity are not respected
Personal correspondence is opened by staff
The setting is run for the convenience of the staff
Excessive or inappropriate doses of sedation / medication are given Access to advice and advocacy is restricted or not allowed
Complaints procedures are deliberately made unavailable

f. Self neglect
Self neglect is different from abuse by others, but it is still a situation that can place people at risk of harm and, potentially, place them in danger. People neglect their own care for a range of reasons of which the most common are: Increasing infirmity

Physical illness or disability
Memory and concentration problems
Sensory loss or difficulty
Mental illness and mental health problems
Learning difficulties / disabilities
Alcohol and drug misuse problems
A different set of priorities and perspectives

g. Neglect by others
Neglect by others occurs when either a support worker or a family or friend carer fails to meet someone’s support needs. Neglecting someone you are supposed to be supporting can result from failing to undertake support services. Neglect and failure to care includes:

Ignoring medical or physical care needs
Failure to provide access to appropriate health, social care or educational services Withholding the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition and heating.

2. Identify the signs and / or symptoms associated with each type of abuse Physical abuse: bruising or finger marks, fractures, scratches or cuts, pressure ulcers or sores from wet bedding or clothing, black eyes or bruised ears, withdrawal or mood changes, reluctance by the vulnerable adult to be alone with the alleged abuser Sexual abuse: scratches, abrasions or persistent infections in the anal / genital regions, pregnancy, blood or marks on underwear, abdominal pain with no diagnosable cause, provocative sexual behaviour, promiscuity, prostitution, sexual abuse of others, aggression, anxiety, tearfulness, refusal to undress for activities such as swimming / bathing. Emotional / psychological abuse: cared for person fearful of raised voices, distressed if they feel they may be “in trouble”, cared for person being treated like a child, referring to the cared for person in a derogatory way.

Financial abuse: someone is not allowed to manage own financial affairs, person nort made aware of financial matters, very few or no personal possessions, unexplained shortage of money, unexplained disappearance of personal possessions or property, sudden change of a will. Institutional abuse: excessive conformity in daily routines by people using the service such as everybody waking up at around the same time, going to bed at around the same time, having too many similar activities and having meals at the same time. Neglect: medical condition deteriorating unexpectedly or not improving as expected, hypothermia or person cold or dressed inadequately, unexplained loss of weight, clothes or body dirty and smelly, delays in seeking medical attention

3. Describe factors that may contribute to an individual being more vulnerable to abuse Individuals can be more vulnerable to abuse because of an infirmity, mental health issues, memory problems, learning difficulties, advanced age, financial problems or lack of knowledge about their rights.

Outcome 2Know how to respond to suspected or alleged abuse

1. Explain the actions to take if there are suspicions that an individual is being abused There are four key priorities in responding to concerns about abuse: Priority 1: Protect
The most important concern is to ensure that the abused person is safe and protected from any further possibility of abuse. Make sure that any necessary medical treatment is provided, and give reassurance and comfort so that the person knows that they are safe. Priority 2: Report

Any abusive situation must be reported to the line manager, or the named person in the workplace procedures for the Protection of Vulnerable Adults. There may be formal reporting procedures in place in the organisation, or you may simply make an initial verbal referral. However, it is essential that you make a full, written report as soon as you can after the event. Priority 3:Ppreserve

Preserve any evidence. If this is a potential crime scene, you must be very careful not to destroy any potential evidence. Priority 4: Record an refer
Any information you have whether it is simply concerns, hard evidence or an allegation, must be carefully recorded. The evidence should be written down because verbal information can be altered and can have its meaning changed very easily when it is passed on.

2. Explain the actions to take if an individual alleges that they are being abused. The priorities in this case are the same as in the case of suspicion. However the first and most important response is that you must believe what you are told. One of the biggest fears of those being abused is that no one will believe them. Confidentiality cannot be always kept in these cases. You must always be clear, when someone alleges abuse, that you cannot promise to keep what they tell you confidential.

3. Identify ways to ensure that evidence of abuse is preserved. In case of physical or sexual abuse there is likely to be forensic evidence. These must be preserved by the following actions: Do not clear up

Do not wash or clean any part of the room or area in which the alleged abuse took place Do not remove bedding
Do not remove any clothes the abused person is wearing
Do not allow the person to wash, shower, bathe, brush hair or clean teeth Keep other people out of the room or area
If financial abuse is alleged or suspected, ensure that you have not thrown away any papers or documents that could be useful as evidence. Neglect generally speaks for itself, but it is important to preserve living conditions as they were found until they can be recorded and photographed. This does not include the person concerned, any treatment and medical attention needed must be provided.

Outcome 3Understand the national and local context of safeguarding and protection from abuse

1. Identify national policies and local systems that relate to safeguarding and protection from abuse There are a number of national policies designed to protect vulnerable adults from abuse: Criminal Justice Act 1998

Civil action by the victim
Care Standards Act 2000
Sexual Offences Act 2003
Family Law Act 1996
Offences Against the Person Act 1861
No Secrets ( England ) , In Safe Hands ( Wales )
Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 ( England and Wales ) Protection of Vulnerable Groups Act 2007 ( Scotland )
ASPA 2007 ( Scotland )
Criminal Injuries Compensation scheme
Mental Capacity Act 2005
Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984
Mental Health Act 1983
Protection from Harassment Act 1997
Theft Act 1968
National Assistance Act 1984
Fraud Act 2006
Office of the Public Guardian

2. Explain the roles of different agencies in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse Both nationally and locally, the protection of vulnerable adults forms part of the Safeguarding Adults agenda. Local authorities now have Safeguarding Adults Boards. The local boards are responsible for delivering a multi-agency response to safeguarding adults and to ensure that all partner agencies are recognising and acting on safeguarding issues at a strategic and individual level. The Care Quality Commission regulates and inspects health and social care services including domiciliary and protect the rights of people detained under the Mental Health Act 1983. The Care Quality Commission has a role in identifying situations which give rise of concern that a person or person(s) using a regulated service is or has been at risk of harm, or may receive and allegation or a complaint about a service which could indicate risk of harm.

The Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) was a non-departmental public body, that existed until 1 December 2012, when it merged with the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) to form the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). The DBS enables organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors to make safer recruitment decisions by identifying candidates who may be unsuitable for certain work, especially that involve children or vulnerable adults, and provides wider access to criminal record information through its disclosure service for England and Wales.

3. Identify reports into serious failures to protect individuals from abuse There are a number of ‘failures in care’, in the examples bellow in which it is highlited what can happen when a service, or organization fails to protect the persons under their care. The Bichard inquiry into the deaths of Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells. www.bichardinquiry.org.uk

You can access information on this case from the above link, which will inform you of the outline of the case, the reason for the failure of care, and the enquiry details. This would be adequate to use as an example of ‘failures of care’. Other points of reference:

Ofsted Baby P report
Amy Howson Report
Alfie Goddard Report

4. Identify sources of information and advice about own role in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse Your employer will have their own policies relating to abuse, whistle blowing, etc. These policies are you’re ‘working documents’, as they inform your practice on how to meet your responsibilities whilst performing your role. However there are local and national policies relating to abuse, which also have to be considered.

Outcome 4Understand ways to reduce the likelihood of abuse

1. Explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced by:

a. Working with person centred values
Person-centred planning is a process of constant review, learning and listening. Person-centred planning focuses on the immediate and the future, taking into account the needs, thoughts, concerns and opinions of the individual, and consulting their family and friends and others within their ‘personal network’. This person-centred approach helps individuals identify their aspirations, and mobilises those concerned – including their personal network, service agents, non-specialist and non- service sources – to help people pursue their own personal ambitions. Services should, in theory, become more flexible and encouraging active participation.

b. Encouraging active participation
There are a few steps that can be taken to ensure active participation. These are: FACILITATE: Make contributing easier. Use tasks. Give preparation. INVESTIGATE: Find out why people are not contributing, what would make it easier for them to contribute. Encourage the use of visual aids. CLARIFY: Clarify expectations and objectives.

DEMONSTRATE: Show how experience-based learning works.
CHANGE: Change the dynamics. Create smaller groups. Silence louder group members. Use temporary rules and gimmicks. CONSULT: Consult the group. Give responsibility. Ask the group to come up with solutions. Be open. Use
transparent training.

c. Promoting choice and rights
This gives the service user the choice to speak out and talk about abuse etc.

2. Explain the importance of an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse. By having an accessible complaints procedure, you are encouraging the individuals in your care to ‘speak up’, about any issues they may have. They will not feel threatened, inadequate, or guilty, about making a complaint, with no fear of repercussions if they do complain. If the complaints procedure is easily accessible, the individual will be aware of what to do in the event of a complaint, who to complain to, and what will happen next.

Outcome 5Know how to recognise and report unsafe practices

1. Describe unsafe practices that may affect the well-being of individuals Unsafe practices that may affect the well being and safety of your service users could include: Poor working practices: This could include not having proper policies to protect the service users, not have correct equipment to perform their role (hoists, ppe, etc). Not working to the current standards, therefore putting service users at risk. Resource difficulties: This could be that staffs are not trained correctly to perform the tasks their role involves. It could be that the ‘home’ is understaffed, as the budget is not there to employ more staff.

The staff group may use agency staff, due to sickness, vacancies etc, and the agency staff are not aware of the needs of the individuals. Necessary facilities/equipment is not purchased due to lack of funds, (wheelchairs, disposable gloves, and correct diet for healthy living, utilities (heating and lighting restricted). Operational difficulties: This could be because of staff shortages, so recommended ratio of staff to service users, are not maintained. The staff group may not work as a team, therefore a continuous service is not maintained, and the service delivery suffers. Inexperienced staff ‘acting up’, in a senior role, that may not have the knowledge to perform the role.

2. Explain actions to take if unsafe practices have been identified It is your responsibility to report any unsafe practices, straight away, to your line manager. To “Blow the Whistle” on somebody or something means to report somebody for doing something wrong or illegal, especially within an organization. Your organization may have a “Whistle Blowing” policy, which will protect you and your employment if you report your concerns. Ask your manager or supervisor, if unsure, but follow your organizations policies regarding ‘reporting’ different concerns. You can seek advice from the Adult Protection Co- ordinator or lead person for Safeguarding Adults based at your local Authority/Council. All concerns should be reported accurately. If your concerns are not taken seriously, you must try another route. You must ask for help if you feel “out of your depth” with a particular individual or issue.

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Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social care Essay

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Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 2292

  • Pages: 9

Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social care

1. How to recognise signs of abuse:

Definition of types of abuse and yours respective signs:

1.1.1 Physical Abuse:
According with NCPEA (National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse) Physical Abuse is a physical force or violence that results in bodily injury, pain or impairment. It is a non-accident use of physical force resulting in body harm. Eg. Pushing, force feeding, burning, scalding, etc.

see more:explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced by encouraging active participation

1.1.2 Signs that a Physical abuse has happened:
Injuries or bruises;
Scratches marks or cuts;
Bite marks;
Cigarette marks;
Behaviour indicators;
Sprains, fractures, broken bones;
Deterioration of health without an obvious cause;
Rough handling or physical coercion.

Also Physical abuse can include:
Force residents to stay in bed or chair;
Using or misusing physical restraints. (Like seat belt).
Lying in wet or soiled bedding.

1.1.3 Factor that can contribute for Physical abuse happen:
Be old
Physical disability

1.1.1 Sexual Abuse:
According with the Older Protective Services Acts Sexual Abuse is an intentionally causing or attempting to cause rape, involuntary sexual intercourse, sexual assault. Also sexual harassment whereupon the individual is forced, tricked, coerced or manipulated into any unwanted sexual contact.

1.1.2 The Physical and Emotional signs for Sexual Abuse is:

Bruises on inner tights or around the breasts;
Genital or anal bleeding;
Difficulty in walk or standing;
Pain or itchy in genital areas;
Infections of genital or anal areas;
Unexplained abdominal pain;
Scared or timid behaviour;
Any sudden change in the individual personality;
Suicidal thoughts and/or attempts;
Agitation, aggression and anxiety;
Reluctance to undress for baths or wash;
Reluctance to stay with the aggressor.

1.1.3 Factor that can contribute for Sexual abuse happen:
Physically frail
Resident to be able to see or hear very well
Don’t think so well as they used to

1.1.1 Emotional/Psychological Abuse:
Is inflicting mental pain, anguish or distress, like verbal or non-verbal acts, insults, threaten, humiliate, harass, bullying, intimidation, shouting and swearing, ignoring, dignity taken away. Psychological abuse can be present in all others abuse.

1.1.2 The emotional signs of Psychological Abuse:
Avoided eye contact or not talking openly;
Anxious, shy, depressed, or withdrawn;
Changes on behaviour;
Fear when in the presence of the abuser;
Low self-esteem;
Often disturbed, scared, hopeless, pessimist.
The individual be scared of shouting or raised voice;
Also some warning of Psychological abuse can be:
A carer ignoring the elderly needs;
The elderly be treated as child, teased or winded up;
The elderly choices not be taken in consideration or respected by caregiver;

No dignity or privacy been preserved causing distress or embarrassment to the elderly.

1.1.3 Factors that can contribute to Emotional/ Psychological Abuse happen:

Having learning or memories problems

Physical ability is frail
Health problems
Culture or religion

1.1.1 Financial Abuse:
Is the unauthorized use of the resources of an elderly individual for a personal benefit or gain.

1.1.2 The signs for financial abuse are:
The elderly individual live in conditions below his financial resources;

Inappropriate activity on bank account;
Frequent checks and gifts made to a caregiver;
Personal belongings going missing;
Sudden change of will;
Shortage of money after no long elderly received their money;

Unexplained expenses;
Family refusing to pay for things even though the elderly has got money to pay.

1.1.3 Factors that can contribute for Financial Abuse happen:

Slowing down mentally
Psychologically depend on someone
Living alone
Ageing.

1.1.1 Institutional Abuse:
Is when an elderly person is being abused by caregivers in an assisted living like a care home. In this type of abuse all the last mentioned types of abuse can happen.

1.1.2 The warning signs of Institutional abuse is:
Waken residents too early;
Food choices are limited and served to early;
Punitive methods adopted by staff;
Ordering residents around or shouting at them;
Dignity or privacy not been respected;
Choices been denied;
Access to outside been denied or forced to be in their bedroom; Inappropriately use of medication to sedate;
Etc.

1.1.3 Factors that can contribute for Institutional Abuse happen:

Dementia
Isolation
Low staffing over long period of time
Poor communication between employer and employee
Elderly have short memory

1.1.1 Self-Neglect:
Is the harm or potential harm created by elderly’s own behaviour rather than the actions of others.

1.1.2 The warning signs of self-neglect is:
Dehydration;
Poor personal hygiene;
Unsafe living conditions, like not indoor plumbing, no heat, no running water;

Inadequate clothing;
Lack of necessary medical aids;
Unsanitary living conditions, like dirty bugs, soiled beddings and clothes; etc.

1.1.3 Factors that can contribute for Self-Neglect happen:
Elderly living alone;
Isolation;
Depression;
Have memory problems;
Physical ability is frail;
Illness;
Mental health;
Learning difficulties;
Exaggerated use of drugs or alcohol;

1.1.1 Neglect by others

Is when an older person is neglected by a caregiver on her basics needs like safety, physical or/and psychological needs, adequate or necessary medication, personal care, etc.

1.1.2 The warning signs of Neglecting by others is:
Unusual loss weight;
Malnutrition;
Dehydration;
Been left dirty or unbathed;
Desertion of an old person at public place;
Untreated physical problems as bed sore;

1.1.3 Factors that can contribute for Neglect by others happen:

Illness;
Dementia;
Social Isolation.

2.1 Actions to take if there are suspicions of abuse or if an individual alleged being abused: When there is an allegation of abuse, all allegations must be listen to and taken seriously and must be reported for the safe and guarding team.

2.2 If someone alleged that they have been abused:
Remain calm and supportive with the victim of abuse;
Reassure the victim that you are there to help and believe them;

Make sure they know it is not their fault;
Ensure the abuser don’t have access to the victim;
Immediately report to your supervisor and safe guarding team;

Do prevent loss or destruction of evidence;
Collect basic information such as who is the alleged abuser and what happened;

Call 911 in an emergency;

2.3 Ways to make sure that evidence of abuse are preserved:

Make written records of phone calls with dates and times;
Don’t tidy up, wash clothes or bedding;
Try not to touch anything;
In case of sexual abuse discourage the victim from washing;
Make sure that anyone else comes to the scene of where the abuse happened.

3.1 National Policies and local systems agencies:
Local Safeguarding Adults Boards.

3.2 The roles of different agencies in Safeguarding and protecting individuals:

Local Systems – Safeguarding Adults Boards, Safeguarding policies and procedures for vulnerable adults.’ Safeguarding Adults Boards – these bring together a number of different local agencies that work with vulnerable adults to share information and monitor their work i.e. local agencies like the police. The Police – their role is to safeguard vulnerable adults, investigate all reports of vulnerable adult abuse and protect and uphold the rights of vulnerable adults. CQC – to monitor and provide guidance on what all health and social care providers must do to safeguard vulnerable adults from abuse; the safeguarding policies, procedures and systems developed are in place to prevent vulnerable adults from being abused.

3.3 Serious case of failure of protection an individual from abuse:

The Winterbourne case which was nationally reported and a local abuse case of Orme house in Lowestoft. The Winterbourne case was more physical and emotional abuse and the Orme house case was more neglect and poor living conditions. The Winterbourne case was reported nationally because it was such a disgusting mistreatment of vulnerable people, 11 members of staff were caught on CCTV after visitors and patients complained about mistreatments. The evidence that was captured showed physical abuse such
as, slapping, poking eyes, pulling hair, even as unbelievable as trapping them under chairs, and soaking residents in freezing cold water. It also showed emotional and verbal abuse in the form of name calling. This was an inhumane and diabolic mistreatment of vulnerable individuals unable to defend themselves.

Winterbourne appears to have made decisions based on profits and returns, over and above decisions about the effective and humane delivery of assessments and treatments. Where were the staff who should have been reporting these crimes to management , if management was not listening then they should have been reported to the authorities and organisations, such as social services and CQC that is what they are there for. The staff who didn`t abuse patients but didn`t report the incidents are just as abusive and responsible, as they were employed to help with patients welfcare. Winterbourne failed to notify the Care Quality Commission of these incidents, injuries to individuals and of occasions when individuals had gone missing.

3.4 Identify sources where can you go to get information and advice about your role in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse:

Response:
Our Staff hand-book;
My manager
The internet
Care Quality Commission
Local Safeguarding Authority
Training in safeguarding

4.1 Explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced:
– Working with person-centred values:
Working with the individuality of each elderly as a single person, the rights as an individual, Preserving the right of choice, privacy, independence, dignity and being respected, considering what they have to say, what he or she wants and putting it in the centre of any decision.

-Encouraging active participation:
Active Participation is an act of encourage or prompt an individual to participate in activities, recognises the individual as a person with rights of decisions and choices.

Promoting choice and Rights:

Encourage them to make their own choices and decisions, encourage participation, encouraging independence, this way it creates self-esteem and confidence in them.

4.2 Explain the importance of an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse.
The complaints procedure give to the complainant the right of be listened to, it is efficient because it clearly says how and to whom make the complaint should be made. The accessible complaints give supports and access to the individual to make their views known. Also it sets a time for a response, given to the complainant a feeling that they have been listened to and taken seriously. Therefore it sets a mind culture of no form of abuse must be acceptable or tolerated.

5.1 Describe unsafe practices that may affect the well-being of individuals:

Inappropriate personal care;
Unsafe administration of medication by not trained caregiver or wrong given dosage;

Caregiver not reporting that a resident is ill, and/or unsteady on their feet;

No appropriate use of gloves and aprons, spreading infection;

Not have a risk assessment in place;

Caregiver not recording on daily recording when any irregularities appear;

Caregiver using equipment without the appropriate training, putting residents in risk of danger;

Leave the resident on the toilet for long, ignoring or not listening when they have something to say;

Misuse of authority such as physical restraint;

5.2 Explain the actions to take if unsafe practices have been identified:
All concerns or suspects of abuse or mistreat should be reported to the manager or supervisor immediately, in verbally and in writing. 5.3 Describe the actions to take if suspected abuse or unsafe practices have been reported but nothing has been done in response: The caregiver has the right to report concerns directly to the multidisciplinary team. Anyone can report suspicion of abuse, the caregiver that don’t report unsafe practices or abuse can be also disciplined, suspended or dismissed.

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Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social Care Essay

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Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social Care Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1375

  • Pages: 6

Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social Care

Principles of safeguarding and protection in health and social.

Ai;
Physical Abuse is when somebody causes feelings of physical pain, injury other suffering or bodily harm, such as hitting, kicking, scratching, pinching, shaking. Sexual Abuse is where you are forced to do, say and watch sexual things. Eg; being undressed or having sexual contact when you do not want to or even touching another person, being made to say sexual things and being made to watch porn is also sexual abuse. Emotional Abuse is a form of power that someone has over you to cause depression, anxiety, stress. It is bullying someone by calling them names that hurts their feeling or to scare them and even threaten them. Financial Abuse is when another person steals or takes something that belongs to you. Eg; stealing your money, making you buy things you are not willing to, refusing to allow individuals to manage their finances and tricking individuals to hand over their property. Institutional Abuse is not only confined to large scale physical or sexual abuse, individuals can also be abused in many other ways in settngs where they could exoect to be cared for and protected. Eg; Individuals not given choice over decisions (meals, outings, clothing.) Mistreated to their medication. Privacy and dignity also not respected. Self-neglect is when an individual neglects to attend to their basic needs. Eg; personal hygiene, appearance, feeding not bothering to obtain medical help or an unwillingness to see people or go out. Neglect by others is when the victim is being looked after by somebody else but fails to provide adequate care. For example failure to provide sufficient supervision, food or medical care, or the failure to fulfil other needs that the victim is unable to provide for herself or himself.

see more:explain the importance of an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse.

Signs and symptoms of abuse.
Physical abuse
Aii;
Bruising
Fractures
Burns
Fear
Depression
Weight loss
Assault
Cowering
Flinching
Welch marks
Malnutrition
Untreated medical problems
Bed sores
Confusion
Over sedation
Emotional abuse:.
Fear
Depression
Confusion
Loss of sleep
Change in behaviour
Onset of phobias
No communication
Sexual Abuse:
Loss of sleep
Diseases
Repeated urinary infections
Bruising
Soreness around the genitals
Torn, stained bloody underwear or bed sheets
Preoccupation with anything sexual
Excessive washing
Reluctance to be alone with an unknown individual
Financial Abuse:
Unexplained loss of fundsor withdrawels from bank accounts Inability to pay bills
Change in lifestyle/standard of living
Basic needs not being met
Loss of property
Unnecessary building work or repairs to property
Not trusting anyone around them
Self-neglect:
Poor hygiene (smell of urine faeces)
Dehydration
Weight loss
Abnormal body temp
Inappropriate clothing
Not taking medication
Infections
Illnesses
Institutional abuse:
No flexibility at bed time
Waking up to a routine
Dirty beds and clothing
Missing clothing, possessions, documents and letters
Excessive or lack of medication
Lack of consideration of dietary requirement’s
Aiii;
If you was to suspect an individual was being abused you should report your concerns to the manager. Also ask to write a private account for your records, making sure it doesn’t go in the care plan in case the abuser comes across it.

Aiv;
If a client was to tell you they are being abused, you should stop what you’re doing and listen carefully to them. All conversations should be treated with confidence and information only passed on to those who need to know. Even if the person speaks in the strictest of confidence, line managers must still be informed and the discussion must be written down. Never agree with the client that you wont tell anyone else. Say that you’ll only tell someone who can do something about it. Av;

Make a written record of messages (e.g answer phones) to ensure they are not lost. Include the date and time and sign them. Ensure written records (notes, letters, bank statements,medication records etc) are kept in a safe place. Do not tidy up, wash clothes, bedding or any other items. Do not try to clear or tidy things up

Try not to touch anything un;ess you have to for the immediate wellbeing of the victim- if you have to try make a record of what you have done. If any sexual offence is suspected try to discourage the vicim from washing, drinking, cleaning their teeth or going to the toulet until the police are present. Preserve anything used to warm or comfort the victim (E.g: a blanket). If you can try to ensure that the alleged perpetrator does not have any contact with the victim. Record any physical signs or injuries using a body & map or hand drawing write a description of any physical signs or injuries including size, shape colour etc. Always remember to sign and date your notes and any other records you have made. Avi, Avii:

No secrets- set out a code of practice of how commissioners and providers of care services should protect vulnerable adults. Criminal records bureau- DBS will filter certain old and minor cautions and convictions, reprimands and warnings from criminal records certificates. DBS- Disclosure and barring service. In safe hands(wales only)- sets out roles and responsibilities of CCIW in relation to other statutory bodies including local authorities who have the lead role in coordinating the development of local policies and procedures in adult protection. Office of the public guardian -agency with responsibilities then extend across England and wales. If supports the public quardian in the registration of enduring powers of attorney and lasting powers of attorney and the supervision of debuties appointed by the court of protection. The code of practice- sets out the criteria against which a registered providers compliance with the requirements relating to cleanliness and infection control will be assessed by the care quality commission.

It also provides guidance on how the provider can interpret and meet the registration requirement and comply with the law. Local Partnership boards- committed to preventing the abuse of adults and responding promptly when abuse is suspected. Safeguarding adults means that local authorities, police and NHS agencies involved with adults who might be at risk of abuse have a duty of care to ensure that procedures are in place, that encourage reporting of suspected abuse, and take action to stop the abuse. Care Quality Organisations (CQC)- registered over 18,000 care homes and publish all inspection reports, which check on the essential standards of quality and safety. Aviii:

Social worker- Protect and support vulnerable people, and place them in a safe environment away from risk of danger. A risk assessment is used to decide what help is needed and the correct actions to take. They also investigate any reports. Police- Protect the community, investigate allegations of abuse, prepare court cases and make case reports. Informal agencies or third sector agencies- Research and raise awareness, campains, charities. Offer support (counselling services) Health care practitioners- Perform examinations and report finding relevant authorities . Serious case review chair person- Review serious investigations and/or failures that have previously been investigated and look at what changed need to be made. Aix:

Many local Authorities run free, multi-agency, safeguarding courses for anyone who works with vulnerable children and adults, and so should any decent employer in this field. Ask your workplace training department about this. You can also find more information through their local safeguarding team in the Social Services Department or the Independent Safeguarding Authority. Direct.gov

Cqc.org.uk
Lancashire county council.

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