Personal Ethics Essay

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Personal Ethics Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1321

  • Pages: 5

Personal Ethics

“Sound personal ethics are typically those that positively impact the experience of others when used to govern an individual’s social or business related behavior, and at the very least, such ethics should not have a negative impact on others” (BusinessDictionary, 2014). In this paper I will discuss how my personal ethical system and ground rules were developed. What my influences were in shaping my values and the principles I live by. I will also discuss how the importance of ethics in business.

EARLY ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT

To understand how my ethics developed I think it would be best if I provided a quick background of my childhood. My parents were divorce by the time I was two. My mom moved to Montana while my dad, brother, and I stayed in Colorado. My mom remarried when I was five to a great man. My dad moved us to Tennessee around when I was seven. My father began dating a woman with two children shortly after and a year or two later they married.  A couple years after my father remarried, the atmosphere in my home was very stressful. My step mom was very southern, with a strict upbringing. Her philosophy was “This was how I was raised, so this is how I am going to raise you.” There was no thought put into her actions, they were only reactions. Although I get along with her fine now she still has to justify her behavior from the past. At the age of eight I was doing my own laundry, cooking meals for the entire family twice a week, and extreme cleaning every weekend; not much time to be a kid.

On my 12th birthday I was grounded for not dusting behind a picture in the corner of my desk. I have many stories like this, but the greatest thing about these experiences is that I learned from them. These memories are what motivated me to be different when it comes to parenting and how I treat people. My step father was the opposite. He was the strong, silent type. When he spoke every one listened. He and my mom had a very large impact on my life. They owned a restaurant/bar and a log home building company for over 25 years, in Montana. In the summers I would work for them. They taught me strong work ethic and what it meant to earn a dollar. During my teen years I was not sure who I was and desperately trying to figure it out. At the time, I thought I had it all figured out, but looking back I was clueless. I used derogatory remarks towards different ethnic groups not realizing how wrong it was and I was very homophobic. I knew it was wrong and no one else in my family acted like that. This type of behavior is still very common in the south, but I was determined to change my life.

REVISED ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT

Because I joined the Navy straight out of high school, I was given the opportunity to learn the true meaning of diversity and how important it is to our society. The stereotypes I was surrounded by growing up were cruel, unfair, and untrue. My time in the Navy taught me that everyone is different and that everyone’s culture is what makes them who they are. I love learning about different cultures and what makes each person diverse. Another event that shaped my principles and values is when my step father passed in 2006. This changed mine and my family’s life forever. It motivated me to love and be the best person I can be. At the time I was in a bad marriage and had to make the decision that my happiness and my children’s future depended on our surroundings. I do not have time for resentment, anger, hatred, and negative behavior. We only live this life once and I want my legacy to live on after I’m gone. I had to make the toughest decision of my life and this was the beginning of the new me.

PRINCIPLES AND VALUES

My ethical system comes from every experience and interaction I have ever had. Whether I remember them all, it still branded an emotion at the time and I learned from it. My ethical system is filled with the idea to always have respect, strength, integrity, honor, courage, and will power to do what is right even if it is the harder decision. Respect is a very strong fiber of my being. My childhood made me realize that treating people the way you would like to be treated is not just something we heard in school, it should be lived by. Everyone starts off with the same level of respect from me. It does not matter one’s title, sex, race, religion, or sexual preference. If you are a living, breathing, human being I will treat you as I would like to be treated. Everyone starts off with 100% respect and then how much respect I give you in the future depends on your actions.

ETHICS IN THE WORKPLACE

My upbringing and personal experiences are what shaped my character of who I am today. I cannot compare the inequality I faced to others, but it was enough for me to realize that fair treatment and respect is very important to who I am and my character. When I see others being mistreated I have a deep seated urge to stand beside them and show them they are not alone. It does not matter to me if I am the only one that feels this way; I will stand up for what I believe in. I was the only straight male that joined the Pride Affinity Group where I work. This group was started at the beginning of the equal rights movement for the LGBT community a couple years ago. I was accused of being gay and I was asked why I was part of the group if I was not gay. This only motivated me more to show others that equal rights are not a privilege. I gave 9 years of my life to defending this country’s freedoms. I did not fight for one group’s freedoms, but all, foreign and domestic. Although I am no longer in the military I still live by this code of ethics and moral standard; in my personal and professional life.

IMPORTANCE OF ETHICS IN BUSINESS

Businesses were around before ethics and will continue to be around, but it is how we choose to evolve as human beings. Society could have remained racist and sexist. This was not what was best for business or society though. We as people and businesses need to evolve, to grow, and to learn to be better. Ethical standards in the workplace ensures all feel comfortable coming to work and can do their job without feeling threatened. This provides businesses the opportunity to get the best out of all employees with a safe work environment. CONCLUSION I think it is safe to say I am the opposite of everything I disliked about my childhood. My personal values are who I am regardless of whether I am in a personal or professional setting. My decisions are based on what I have learned through life experiences and how I perceive the most appropriate way to handle each situation.

References

Business Dictionary (2014). Personal Ethics. Retrieved from: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/personal-ethics.html

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Personal Ethics Essay

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Personal Ethics Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1174

  • Pages: 5

Personal Ethics

When faced with a decision which requires an ethical framework, my usual pattern of decision making follows a pattern of reflection and introspection. The introspective element is both cerebral, that is: based in a rational analysis of the issue or matter at hand, and also intuitive, of which is to some degree an assessment of the emotional components of the decision at hand.

However, intuitive introspection, at least in my opinion, transcends the boundaries of rationality as we understand it, and it even transcends our understanding of emotional responses, so intuition, although critical to my own decision making process is a slightly difficult aspect to illuminate. I once read the following paradigm somewhere. The origin of the paradigm is lost to my present memory, but the paradigm was this: whenever you are faced with a truly perplexing “yes or no” or “do or don’t” or “either or” decision, and you really can’t seem to make up your mind, flip a coin and assign “heads” to one outcome, and “tails” to the other.

Now, when the result of the coin flip is shown, assess your feeling about the result and you will see what you wanted to do all along. In other words, say your choice is between going to a movie or playing a video game with your friends online. You can’t make up your mind which would be abetter choice, so you flip the coin, assigning “heads” to going to the movie, and “tails” to playing video games, vowing to abide by the result.

Now, let’s assume the result of the coin flip is “tails” — staying home to play video games — and you feel excited, pleased and happy right away without thinking. Then staying in is what you wanted all along. If the coin-flip result of “tails” — staying home to play video games — made you want to flip the coin again for a different result, then you would know the same thing, that what you actually wanted to do was stay home and not go out to the movie. That is not to say that I make my decisions, trivial or profound, based on a coin flip!

What I am driving at is that we often have intuitive feelings that lurk below the level of our rational consciousness and we can access this intuition in some cases when making decisions. As someone who has little faith in absolute ethical systems, or in a morality which is based on abstract philosophy, I like to include my own feelings, as well as my rational understanding of ethical concepts when I am faced with decisions. The underlying principles which inform the way I live my life are also drawn from the aforementioned notion of intuition or deep-introspection.

For example, if I refuse a certain job offer, or even the offer of friendship on specific occasions this may have less to do with something which could be expressed in a linear fashion: the job was too demeaning, or that person had the wrong hair-style or hobby, but with something that might be more difficult to articulate clearly, but which is much more crucial than any superficial notions that might be viewed by some as important gauges or cues. In short, I don’t have any kind of “maxim” or concrete set of principles — edicts, I believe they are called — but rather a sense of personal disposition and emotional bearing.

For example, I don’t like to hurt people’s feelings; viscerally: I just do not like to witness their pain so I avoid doing so when I can manage it. On the other hand, I take a rather dim view of altruism or the notion of helping people or giving them charity. I feel awkward placing myself in a position where I am apt to start pitying or feeling sorry for people; I myself dislike being pitied or felt sorry for, so I guess I assume it is the same for others. I tend to adopt the pursuit of happiness and personal joy (not to be confused with hedonism) as key aspects of my world view.

That is, I am, at heart, an optimist who dislikes “whining” and cynicism and the pursuit of superficial self-gratification at the expense of others. That certainly does not mean that I advocate “selflessness” — whatever that term may indicate as a way of life, but rather, that I view joy, success, and fulfillment at least to some degree to be communal in nature. It is necessary that all acknowledge that everyone is a part of the human experience, no matter who or what they are. there are no exceptions.

In my work, I try very hard to be both competent and respectful of those who I work with and for — but I often find it difficult to refrain from voicing my opinions, especially when I believe there is a possibility that my input may be helpful. I realize that work is a primary form of self-expression and self-fulfillment in life. My idea is that most people either love their jobs and derive a large part of their self-identity and worldly power through their jobs, or they hate their jobs and are constricted, limited, and oppressed by them.

So, to my mind, it is crucial that you endeavor as much as possible to find a job that puts you in the former rather than the latter category because so much of life keys off of one’s work. One thing that I am convinced about is that everyone should bring the same emotional involvement and enthusiasm to their jobs as they very often bring to their hobbies, just as I believe most people should try to bring the same level of integrity and competence to their personal relationships as is usually required by their jobs. Obviously, I would not advocate the pursuit of money as a reliable indicator of whether or not a job is the right or wrong job.

It is much more important that a job facilitate one’s sense of self-esteem and emotional security than whether or not the financial rewards are above and beyond “fair. ” That said, a fair salary is always indicated because without it, maintaining self-respect and self-esteem is made more difficult. While there is no single “litmus test” for whether or not one’s work is the right work for them, the emotional and intuitive aspects of decision making can help as much in assessing a job’s strengths and weaknesses as a cold rational evaluation of the facts.

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Personal Ethics Essay

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Personal Ethics Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1591

  • Pages: 6

Personal Ethics

Personal ethics comes from inside and are influenced by our everyday life and people around us. The directions we obtain as a child helps to form and begin our awareness of ethics. My upbringing memoirs and experiences instilled a well-built belief in family structure and significance of family in general. I was fortunate to be born and brought up in India in a traditional Roman Catholic family. My father was a doctor and he died of heart attack when I was ten years old. My mother was a registered nurse and I have three older brothers and one younger sister. My mother went to the Middle East to work as a nurse and had to leave us in a boarding school. I missed my mother a lot while I was in the boarding school. That was when I decided what I wanted to do. My only ambition was to become a nurse to be with my mother. I always used to watch my parents caring sick people. My parents constantly reminded me to live in Christian faith.

They led us by example all the time, providing precious lessons vital to my development. My parents taught me to treat others as we would want them to treat us. I also learned from my parents that every person is important and we should love and respect them. I strive to live by those set of laws, though it is not always easy. My faith also influences my philosophy. I believe in God and God has a plan and purpose for every one of us. This is the basis of my ethical practices. Each individual cultivates different cultural, spiritual and personal values from their own life experiences which add to their worldview and philosophy of nursing in their practice. To me ethics is my own personal belief structure. Knowing our own personal values is critical to every person. My moral compass in nursing offers highest priority for the wellbeing of patients. My moral courage helps me to speak up, stand up for my personal belief and moral values and bring about change in my work place. The personal and professional values, my relationship and behaviors to others and my morals help me succeed in my personal and professional life.

Our conscience acts as a judge for each one of us. We are responsible for our actions. I believe that God is using me as a tool to care for the needy by providing me the knowledge and ability to promote healing. I also believe in the power of prayer. My patients used to tell me I am always smiling. I believe that it is the gift of God and being a nurse is, a calling not just a career. World view is a personal insight about meaning and reality. It helps the person to interprets, through his or her own eyes, a personal belief about the world. My personal worldview is shaped by my Christian religion, origin as an Indian, circumstances, experiences, and education and philosophy. I accept God as the center of the universe. I believe that I am a good mother for my three kids, faithful wife to my husband and an excellent nurse. I also believe in afterlife. I take pride in my profession. My nursing philosophy comes from my desire to care for others. I consider that nursing care is based on concrete evidence that is provided within a respectful framework. I always treat my patients the way I wanted to be treated if I am in that situation.

Nurses are honored to interact with patients and families at some of the most vulnerable points in their lives. Being considerate of that vulnerability is important. Being respectful of my health care team is also important, as I consider that each of us play a fundamental role in the care of patients and families that we provide. I believe that God is using me as a tool to care for the needy by providing me the knowledge and ability to promote healing. It is essential for the nurses to understand their own selves so that they are able to take care of their patients better. I believe that spirituality plays an important role in the nursing profession. I think that the care of the soul is the beauty of the art of caring in nursing. The values such as integrity, responsibility, trust, reliability, and honesty are some of the personal values, which will determine how we face the world. Reliability and responsibility are very important to one’s professional and personal life.

Culture is something that a person learns from his family and surroundings, and is not inbuilt in him from birth. My upbringing as a Christian in Southern part of India, active participation in church activities and catholic schooling have helped me to value human dignity and assist me to take right decision in my personal and professional life. Awareness of different rules about how their members coexist with each other and interact with each other. Some cultures believe that discussing death, making a living will can invite death to the person who is ill. Looking at the life in different ways should be respected always (Runzheimer & Larsen, 2011). Cultural diversity and differences in personal values can direct our relations with patients, family, and co-workers. Cultural competence is the ability to provide effective care for patients and families and our co- workers who come from different cultures. To understand different cultural beliefs and practices requires flexibility and a respect for others viewpoints .

Ethical issues occur in everyday practices. An ethical dilemma is described as a type of situation that involves being in between two correct courses of action that leads the person to choose the right move and still be wrong at the same time (Purtillo, 2011). This can cause a lot of distress as it encompasses both ethical conflict and conduct. The ethical decision what we make should respect the patient and family desires, physician’s belief and concepts on life and death in our own view. Many situations arise in the critical care where nurses and doctors are obligated to make ethical decisions in a short period of time. Few years back I came across a situation in our ICU. A 90 year old woman from nursing home got admitted with history of multiple strokes with weakness on her right side, emphysema and difficulty in swallowing. She was demented also. Her admission diagnosis was aspiration pneumonia. She had two children and her son was the health care proxy who was living in California and he couldn’t come to visit her mother because of some personal situation.

Patient’s daughter who was living locally was taking care of her. The daughter wanted to place the feeding tube and treat for every problem. We respected the daughter’s decision. We started her on antibiotics. We placed the feeding tube and and started feeding her. Day by day her respiratory status started deteriorating. The attending physician contacted the patient’s son over the phone and explained the patient’s condition in detail. Apparently, we found out from him that the patient had a living will that stated she did not want any feeding tube or even antibiotics in a situation where her quality of life was poor. Fortunately patient’s son came with her living will and our hospital ethics committee had a talk with her family especially the daughter. Because the patient’s wishes were clearly stated in the living will, she was made comfortable and transferred her to a private room to allow the family to be with her all the time and she died peacefully after one day.

In this situation, the daughter wanted to treat her mother even though she knew about her wishes and she did not tell us anything about the patient’s living will. She was acting unrealistic in this situation. The decision was tough for the daughter in this situation. In my view the physician made the right choice to contact her son that put an end to her sufferings. Nurses can make satisfactory solutions to the different ethical problems through creative and knowledge based approach.

Each nurse has the responsibility to optimize the caring response and reduce damage to the patient. .“ Nurses are leaders and vigilant advocates for the delivery of dignified and humane care. Nurses actively participate in assessing and assuring the responsible and appropriate use of intervention in order to minimize unwarranted or unwanted treatment and patient suffering” (American Nurses Association, 2001). The significant impact we make in the lives of our patients and their families in their vulnerable situations and the positive encouragement I get from my nurse manager, co-workers, patients and families keeps me moving in my profession.

References
American Nurses Association (2001). Code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements. Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://www.sfcc.edu/files/SFCC NursingStudentHandbook Purtilo, R., & Doherty, R. (2011). Ethical dimensions in the health professions. (5th ed.). P (5-10) St.Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Saunders. Role of the Registered professional nurse. June 8, 2005. Retrieved on June 6, 2012 from http://www.nysna.org/practice/positions/position6.htm Runzheimer, J., & Larsen, L. (2011). Medical ethics for dummies. (p. 113). NJ: WileyPublishing.

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