Obesity in children Essay

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Obesity in children Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 573

  • Pages: 2

Obesity in children

Introduction

Childhood obesity is a major problem not only nationally but locally as well. Childhood obesity is a doorway to other major issues children suffer from in today’s society such as bullying, and is the major contributor to health related issues not only as a child but issues that will haunt their health in their future endeavors. Let’s Move is a fantastic campaign that brings awareness to the epidemic that is childhood obesity.

Attention Getter

As Americans we strive to create and maintain a family it’s in our DNA. The whole idea behind having children is to strive to make their lives as fulfilled and as joyous as possible, so how can we possibly look the other way when our children are choosing Xbox and chips over a nice home cooked meal and a game of neighborhood tag.

Thesis Statement

Over the past three decades the American rate for Childhood Obesity has astoundingly tripled. Today one in three children are deemed overweight or obese. The first step to solving this problem is recognizing it as an epidemic that is hitting OUR children. If we don’t solve this problem nearly one third of all children born in 2000 or later will suffer from diabetes at some point in their lives. Many others will face chronic obesity-related health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer, and asthma.

Presenter Credibility

I am by no means a pediatrician or an expert in child rearing. I have no children of my own yet, but I absolutely cannot wait to one day be a mom. All I know is what it’s like to chubby kid growing up and what it’s like to live life unhealthy and unhappy. Now that I’m older I can see ways that my healthy lifestyle is directly related to my mood.

Statement of Motivation

We are a country that undoubtedly love our children but somehow love has turned into overindulging and over caudling an issue that some just push under the rug to keep children happy; When in turn happiness through cookies will turn to bullying, health issues, and low self-esteem. It’s time to reevaluate how we make our children happy.

Preview

Thirty years ago, kids ate just one snack a day, whereas now they are trending toward three snacks, resulting in an additional 200 calories a day. Portion sizes have also exploded. In total, we are now eating 31 percent more calories than we were forty years ago–including 56 percent more fats and oils and 14 percent more sugars and sweeteners. The average American now eats fifteen more pounds of sugar a year than in 1970. Eight to 18-year old adolescents spend an average of 7.5 hours a day using entertainment media, including, TV, computers, video games, cell phones and movies, and only one-third of high school students get the recommended levels of physical activity needed to burn half of these calories. This is terrible news for our kids, we should wake up and fix things before the somehow get worse than what they already are.

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Obesity in Children Essay

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Obesity in Children Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 870

  • Pages: 3

Obesity in Children

What parents allow their children to eat can affect their bodies and their life. Most children don’t realize the effects of long term illnesses such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart condition and high blood pressure. Taxing unhealthful foods and beverages could prove an important strategy to overconsumption and potentially aid in weight loss and reduced rates of diabetes among children and adults. Junk food should be taxed because it will reduce obesity, type 2 diabetes, and health care costs. First of all, taxing junk food will lower obesity among Americans.

The increase in both soda and pizza found that many Americans would still buy junk food regardless of a price increase. Taxing of sugary beverages at a penny-per-ounce rate with the goal of decreasing consumption of obesity caused in drinks. The junk food tax would fund obesity related health initiatives such as diabetes care. Obesity has been acknowledged as a national problem, notion of taxing junk food doesn’t seem so bad. Secondly, Americans need to take better control over what they eat and what they feed their children.

We must take a stand against obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease in children and young adults. Most fast foods contain process meats and considered unhealthy in children. Americans don’t have an ideal what they are eating in fast food restaurants. How the government determined what foods should be served in schools. A couple of school systems such as Texas and California had a great idea to remove soft drinks, pop, soda, energy drinks and cola from the schools lunch rooms along with fast foods such as burgers, French fries, hot ogs and convenience stores, too fight the obesity epidemic among the United States and children. Replace drinks with orange juice, and water. Replace fast foods with fresh fruits, vegetables, salads and exercise. Obesity in the United States has risen from 48 percent to 65 percent within the last thirty years and so has health care which has sky racket. We need to be more proactive in saving our children by eating healthier foods in the home and school.

Schools need to change the vending machines to reflect eating healthy will help the body to become healthier. The school environment, nutrition, organizational support groups, school policies that take away things such as sweetened beverages, and replace them with water, juice, fruit, vegetables and less junk food. Availability of less healthful food and beverages in schools is worldwide. Despite changes in improving school food environment, availability of high fat food such things as pizza and hamburgers remain high in United States schools.

Canadian elementary schools seem to have fewer vending machines, but less healthful food and beverages are available to all grades as they are made available through outlets such as cafeteria, school stores. It is said that schools may influence students into eating unhealthy by the lunches they provide and the vending machines that are in schools. Lastly, fast foods are not good because they have no nutrition value, most children that consume fast foods on a daily basic start to gain weight due to lack of exercise. Children watch more TV and play more video games than exercising.

Less exercise in schools, have also been a major factor contributing to obesity in children. Fast foods make children tired, the more you eat the less energy you have. When you walk into a store whether it’s a large grocery store or a small convenience store the lack of fruits and vegetables are small. Most children and adults are unaware that they have high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Most children who suffer from obesity also have a high rate of asthma. It would be a good idea if governments would rate schools on lunches they are providing to students.

The school should prohibit advertising of fast foods, sweets and pop, prohibit use of less healthful foods , provide advertising that deals with eating healthy and healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, seek educational requirements for school food and include requirements for nutrition education. Include exercise in the diet each day that way children won’t feel tried after eating lunch. They will burn off fast and their bodies will feel better and become better in the long run. We need our children to be healthy. We need to avoid sickness, obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure.

Americans need to limit the intake of fast foods and start looking at healthy choices for themselves and their children. Medical bills have sky racket. If we plan to keep our generation of children around we better start looking at better ways of eating and providing nutrient in our everyday diet. Most people have cars, less people walk, ride bikes, or exercise. We have become lazy when it comes to exercise and eating healthy. Look at your children and ask yourself, do I want my child to continue looking like this, obese, sick and unhealthy.

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Obesity in Children Essay

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Obesity in Children Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1498

  • Pages: 6

Obesity in Children

Conclusion Because the rate of childhood obesity is increasing at a disturbing rate, experts fear that this will cause a remarkable load of illness in the future of our children even now a growing number of diabetic young adults is becoming a norm. Preventing, identifying and treating of children and adolescents who are obese are becoming a core medical intervention priority for the government and all concerned institutions.

Since there is not clear answer as to how and why children become obese and currently a variety of reasons blamed for this obesity including genetics, culture, habits, individual practice, parental practice, sedentary lifestyle, poor eating habits and such. Research at the molecular level has been progressing, but there is no actual understanding as to the whole image from a biological viewpoint.

One might realize that there is no singular factor that can be blamed for a child becoming overweight or obese, it is a combination of factors that plays a role in promote obesity. The increasing obesity rates not only in adults but also in children these trends, in conjunction with obesity’s medical, psychological, and economic effects, emphasize the need for interventions and policy advice aimed at preventing obesity.

Directives to remove soft drinks from public schools have started in some cities but despite the variety and number of researches done on the topic of obesity one may note that it remains to be a critical health problem. It seems that there are no enough intervention programs that have taken place in order to curve the problem. It is noted that not enough is being done in order to stop the rising trend of obese children but time has come that it must be addressed as a rising and critical problem that needs immediate attention if we are to cultivate healthy children.

It will be noted that as children are obese and they are reaching their adolescence, the decrease in physical activity and the predilection to junk foods, fast foods and such also decreases the mental capacity of the child in a sense that they are more apt to laziness because of decreased energy rather go to school and participate in class, most of them are sleepy and usually uncomfortable in their own skins.

It is of note that this problems if persistent will make for a bleak future for our children, since the society is cultivating lazy, fat children who will turn out to be lazy fat adults. One can imagine how it would be like in the future. Promotion of a healthy lifestyle not only for our children but for ourselves as well should be a major thrust of the government if curving the current situation is to be achieved.

The thought at a young age children will be subjected to diseases and concern that is normally associated with the elderly and geriatric patients should be carefully considered and rejected. In developing an afterschool wellness program the author notes that it is not as simple as devising exercise plans for the children. It is a holistic approach that requires a multifaceted planning that includes education, healthy diet plans and the actual activity period.

And it is also noted by the writer that in order to curve obesity in children, drastic measures must be employed not only by the obese children themselves but the whole family and the whole community. Developing healthy eating habits and leisure activity changes require changes that involve the family in order for the child not feel left out or forlorn. It is also of note that simple family physical activities will help curve obesity. One may realize that everything starts out at home and spilled over to the school then to the community.

If we wish to curve obesity in children and protect our children’s health it is imperative that the community in particular and the nation in general work hand in hand so that attention maybe given and directives to promote healthy eating in schools and within the community be fostered and community get togethers that involves physical activities, community dances in the park, weekend exercise program for the community can be facilitated by the general community so that everyone may take part in keeping the family and our children healthier and live fuller lives.

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