Healthy Grief Essay

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Healthy Grief Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1038

  • Pages: 4

Healthy Grief

Grieving is a natural part of life. Everyone grieves at some point in their lives, whether it’s the loss of a beloved 1st pet fish or a loss of a loved one’s life, everyone grieves differently and everyone requires different approaches during the grieving process. This paper will describe the various stages of grief and what to expect with each stage. This paper will also compare and contrast the grieving process as defined by Kubler-Ross, the story of Job while incorporating the Catholic religion. The interaction between joy and the Kubler-Ross model will also be described.

In the book of Job, Job is presented as a wealthy, righteous man living somewhere between 2000-1000 B.C. Job suddenly experiences the loss of his family, his possessions, and his health. Job relies on his friends to provide him with comfort. Each stage of grief according to Kubler-Ross is seen within the story of Job. The first stage, denial, is noticed when Job denies the severity of his medical condition. Job’s anger, which is the second stage of grief, is expressed in 7:11-15 “Therefore I will not keep silent; I will speak out in the anguish of my spirit, I will complain in the bitterness of my soul”. When Job had learned of the death of his 10 children, he tore his clothes and shaved his head in anger.

The third stage of grief, which is also known as the bargaining stage, is expressed when Job starts to bargain with God in 9:33-34 “If only there were someone to arbitrate between us, to lay his hand upon us both, someone to remove God’s rod from me, so that his terror would frighten me no more”. Depression, which is the fourth stage of grief is apparent in 10:18 “Why then did you bring me out of the womb? I wish I had died before any eye saw me”. Job wishes that he had never have been born so he wouldn’t have to endure the grief and loss which he is experiencing. Acceptance, which is the final stage of grief, is reached after Job stated in (13:15) “Though he slay me, yet will I hope in him.” This versus is a very powerful versus as it is a reminder to be kind and helpful to others although others may not demonstrate these actions.

The Kulber-Ross theory of grief, designed in 1969 by Elisabeth Kubler is most commonly known as the five stages of grief. The five stages of grief represent the stages that on experiences while undergoing grief or similar life events. Ross created this model is describe the stages of grief for people undergoing terminal illness; however, this model can be used for various forms of significant loss such as divorce, loss of job, natural disaster, or loss of a loved one.

The first stage describes a temporary state of disbelief called denial. During the denial stage, an individual shuts out actuality and denies anything bad is really happening. The second stage of grief is called bargaining. Bargaining is when an individual realizes that the denial cannot continue and begins to come to terms with reality. The person may become anger and question why is this happening. People may become angry with themselves, loved one, or others. The third stage is of grief is the bargaining stage. During this stage, patients tend to wish that they can postpone or delay their illness or death.

People display their spirituality in great detail during this phase. They beg for a higher power to undo their loss and make things better again. It’s during the fourth stage that patients tend to feel depressed about their impending situation. The person begins to disconnect himself/herself of life, love, and affection. Most grieving occurs during this stage after the person realizes that their demise is becoming more inevitable. The last and final stage of grief is known as the acceptance stage. It is during this stage that the person has come to terms with their prognosis and feel as if they can reengage in their daily lives again.

People of the Catholic religion, much like most people incorporate the five stages of grief into their lives unnoticeably in times of tragedy. Catholics also experience the most painful form of life, which is losing a loved one. Catholics deny the event, they become angry, they attempt to bargain, they feel depressed, and over time, they learn to accept. Much like Job is thousands and thousands of years ago.

My own personal way to grieving is probably much different than the average person. When a loved one dies, I feel sad, but I do not display sadness nor do I cry. Instead, I celebrate them. I celebrate their life and encourage others to do the same. You would have never of guessed I had just lost my Mom when she passed away a few years ago. Instead of enduring the five stages of grief, I bypass the first four stages and fell into the acceptance stage. I accepted that she was too sick to be here on Earth and her passing was actually a beautiful moment at which I no longer saw the pain and struggle in her eyes. I am confident that she felt a sense of relief as well.

After researching the stages of grief, the writer of this paper is more aware of the process that is needed to people to spirituality be able to heal after a significant event. During the grief process, people experience many emotions, which is clearly defined in the five stages of grief. To acknowledge that Job encountered grief many, many years ago in the exact same way people do now in modern age is reassuring and comforting. Upon completing research of grief, the information learned has not changed by view of grief; however it has made me more aware of the various ways that people react to grief.

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Healthy Grief Essay

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Healthy Grief Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 873

  • Pages: 3

Healthy Grief

The loss of a family member and/or loved one can put someone on an emotional roller coaster. Whether it is an expected or unexpected loss, the emotional process of dealing with the grief could be the same. With an expected loss, loved ones are able to prepare themselves for what is to come. An unexpected loss could bring more emotions into the grieving process. This paper will discuss the grieving process by Kubler-Ross, the story of Job, and the way Muslims deal with death and dying. While some people focus on the sadness of losing a loved one, others try and find the positive in the any situation.

To grieve the loss of a loved one, many would say that they feel a lot of different indescribable emotions. Shock, disbelief, emotional pain, anger, and sadness are all some emotions that people feel while grieving. Kubler-Ross developed a five step grieving process that one should experience and move through so they can move on to a happy life (Lecture 5 Notes). The process itself is: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance (Lecture 5 Notes). It is easy for a person to not believe that a loved one has passed on as begin the grieving process (Lecture 5 Notes).

Once the denial has processed and the loss has become a reality, it is normal to get angry and ask ‘why did this happen?’ Bargaining with God is the next step in the grieving process. Trying to make a deal with God to try and bring back a loved one gives a person hope that their loved one will come back. Once reality has set in, depression is the next step (Lecture 5 Notes). This is when the feelings of hopelessness set in, making it difficult for a person to pass this stage (Lecture 5 Notes). The last stage of the grieving process is acceptance (Lecture 5 Notes). This is the stage that helps a person emotionally move on from grieving the loss of a loved one. Life goes becomes a new type of normal with the memory of the loved one instead of the having the loved one there (Lecture 5 Notes).

In the book of Job, Satan challenges Job’s faith and love for God, with God’s permission (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). Satan does everything in his power to get Job to not only doubt God, but to curse him as well (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). Satan killed his ten children and destroyed his livestock and servants (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). Job focused more on God and praised him as he mourned loss of his children and wealth (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). Satan then tried one last time by filling Job’s body with sores (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). The doubt of his wife and the negativity of his colleagues never gave him a change of heart. Job remained faithful to God, never doubted Him (he doubted himself at times), and still praised Him (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). God eventually replenished Job’s wealth and blessed him with more children (Study Bible-NLT, 2008). Job grieved in a very healthy way. He did not blame others and he did not curse God. He tried to find the good in every bad situation.

One religion that differs from Christianity and western civilization’s way of grieving the loss of a loved one is the Islamic religion. With death and dying, Muslims believe that there is life after death (Ross, 2001). It is believed that believers of the religion must practice the five pillars of Islam and live a righteous life on earth in order to have a different afterlife than those ‘unbelievers’ (Ross, 2001). People of the Islamic religion must mourn as they prepare for a quick burial (Ross, 2001). A loved one should be buried the day of death or the day after, not any later (Ross, 2001). In public, it is not of their norm for women to show any emotion at a time like this (Ross, 2001).

Finding joy in the midst of losing a loved one can be trying. But like Job in the Bible, joy could come quicker if faith is not lost. Grieving is a challenging time to stay positive. Making the attempt to stay positive helps push one through the grieving process without getting stuck in one of the stages for too long. A good way to find joy is to continue to praise God and not to lose faith in Him.

In closing, re-reading the book of Job in the Holy Bible has reminded me of how important it is to praise God in the midst of a storm. The loss of a loved one is tragic for anyone and grieving is a natural process in life. But if the focus stays on praising God and not losing faith, that grieving process can turn into a healing process and it is possible to find peace in the midst of grieving. God always has a rainbow waiting at the end of each
storm, it just depends how long it takes for you to play in the rain before you get there.

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Healthy Grief Essay

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Healthy Grief Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1279

  • Pages: 5

Healthy Grief

The Book of Job is a profound story about a man who was “perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil” (Job 1:1). Job was a man who had a loving family, prospered and was very wealthy. For whatever reason, Satan challenged God regarding Job. Satan told God that if everything were taken away from Job, he would surely curse God. It was a “bet” of sorts. So God gave Satan the power to destroy everything Job had with the exception of Job’s life. Satan took away Job’s possessions, family and health. Unbelievably, even after all his loss, Job still fell to the ground and worshipped God. Job 1:2-20)

The trials and hardships that Job suffered were inconceivable, yet Job seemed to persevere and demonstrate resilience beyond what is human. What made the difference? Was it his faith? This paper will discuss the five stages of the Kubler-Ross grieving process. It will examine the successful example of Job’s own grieving process as it relates to the Baha’i faith. The Five stages of Kubler-Ross can be seen throughout the story of Job. According to Kubler-Ross (2013), the grieving process is comprised of five formal stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally acceptance.

The first stage, denial, actually enables the person to initially endure an incredible loss. While it may seem counterintuitive, denial is actually a critical aspect of the healthy healing process. It is comparable to entering a stage of shock. The act of denial actually is a protective mechanism that helps a person cope with the overwhelming situations. (Kubler-Ross & Kessler 2013) One could interpret Job’s statement, “Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away”(Job 1:21) as a form of denial. Others may interpret it as his unwavering faith in God’s plan.

Anger is the next stage, and is absolutely essential to the grieving process. Job is seen voicing his anger, “Therefore I will not restrain my mouth, I will speak in the anguish of my spirit; I will complain in the bitterness of my soul. ” (Job 7:11) Pain is the emotion most closely related to and buried under anger. So, in essence, the pain drives anger and anger drives change. As it relates to the grieving process, anger instigates a form of strength and can provide the backbone and structure necessary to move on to the next stage. Kubler-Ross & Kessler 2013) Although Job voices his anger it isn’t directed to God but rather the situation.

Bargaining in the third stage and is the stage of negotiating. In their mind, a person will remain in the past, and try anything to return to the way things were before. (Kubler-Ross & Kessler 2013) At first glance, it appears Job doesn’t ever go through the bargaining stage, he clearly expresses his sadness. He continues to praise and worship God in spite of the losses he is going through. However, one can observe how he clearly wishes he could return to the way things were before. He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength, who hath hardened himself against him, and hath prospered. ” (Job 9:4) But his sorrow could certainly be seen as a type of bargaining with God to relieve his sorrow. The fourth stage is depression, the stage where one will experience feelings of emptiness and hopelessness. Some people worry that their feelings of despair will last forever. Yet this stage is part of the natural order of loss, and a critical component of the five stages. When someone is depressed they become withdrawn. They sometimes question whether or not they should go on themselves.

The depression stage is part of the natural healing process and is a necessary step one must experience in order to heal. (Kubler-Ross & Kessler 2013) Job reveals his own deep depression he says, “My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle, and are spent without hope. “(Job 7:6) “Let that day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said. ” (Job 3:3) and continues to question why he survived birth and should probably never have been conceived. (Job 3:3-11). Job is feeling hopeless and is becoming depressed. He also feels his problems are ith no end in sight, and he is experiencing the thoughts of giving up.

Acceptance of his trials is evident in Job 13: 15-16 “Through he slay me, yet will I trust in him, He also will be my salvation. ” Job accepts that God is wise and puts his trust in him. This stage is about the acceptance of a new reality; people change, learn and develop empathy from their grief to move on. Acknowledging the pain and moving on doesn’t mean the past is forgotten, rather it enables the person to move forward with an open heart and a broader perspective.

Job didn’t fully understand the purpose of his trials, but he accepted the omnipotence of his God. His faith sustained him just as faith sustains people today. Job’s faith is similar to that of the Baha’i faith. Those of the Baha’i faith believe that the body, mind, and spirit grow when they are tried by suffering. Trails or tests are viewed as a gift from God. Those who have these tests and persevere will have happiness while those who don’t are cowards. They are asked to turn to God and pray when enduring these tests and be thankful. Grief and sorrow do not come to us by chance, they are sent to us by the Divine Mercy for our own perfecting” (Baha’i International Community 2013).

Job persevered and believed there was a reason to why God was putting him through these trials. Studies have shown that those who attend church, pray, and actively practice their faith actually suffer less depression and resolve their grief sooner than those with little or no faith at all. (Quick, 2012) Clearly, there appears to be a correlation between spiritual beliefs or faith, and the ability to handle stress and accept tragedies in a more positive way.

Healthcare providers, counselors, and clergy have all recognized that having a faith to cling to or a greater belief in life after death can ease the grieving process. In conclusion, having a belief in a greater power and life after death can make dealing with loss much easier. When a person has something to cling to, it can make dealing with trauma or loss more manageable. If there was no belief in life after death or no belief in a greater power, life’s tragedies would be far more difficult to deal with. It’s actually healthy to cultivate a belief in something.

Like Job, we will all experience some type of loss in our lives. Grief is a common thread to each and every person on the planet. Identifying the stages of grief, and having the resources and skills to cope with grief is crucial for handling grief in a healthy way. Everyone experiences the stages of grief. The difference seems to be faith. People who have a deep sense of faith are better equipped and more quickly navigate the stages of grief. As with Job, their faith allows them to go forward and successfully help others through the grieving process.

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Healthy Grief Essay

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Healthy Grief Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1627

  • Pages: 7

Healthy Grief

Feeling and expressing grief is unique to each individual and it depends on the nature of their loss. People experience all kinds of emotions, pain and sadness that are considered normal reactions to a significant loss. While there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the grief (helpguide.org). Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, a Psychiatrist invented the “five stages of grief”, based on the grieving process when negative life changes and loses happen, such as death of a loved one. The five stages of grief according to Kubler-Ross are responses that many people may go through, but there is not a typical response to loss as there is no typical loss and everyone grieves differently (helpguide.org).

The five stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. The story of Job in the Bible is an example that displays all the stages of grief set forth by Kubler-Ross’s grief model. Job was a Christian man who followed the path of God’s will in His life. Kubler-Ross was not a Christian, and formulated the grief model from observing patients in a hospital who were dying from terminal illness. Job suffered great loss in his life and endured different stages in his grieving process but never denounced God. The five stages of grief compared and contrasted with the life of Job Denial

The first response of grief according to Kubler-Ross is denial and isolation. This is a stage of shock and numbness and a time when a grieving person is trying to grasp the situation that something tragic has just happened in their life. Job is grieving at his tremendous loss., he lost his children, his wealth and health. It seemed unreal to Job that he tore his clothes, shaved his head and fell on the ground. Job 1: 21 reads “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return there.

The Lord gave, and the Lord has taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord “(The Christian Life Bible). Job mourned and lamented at his loss but did not reject God. In contrast to the grief model where the patients knew they were going to die, Job even in his loss knew that he had life. Job maintained total submission to God’s plan in his life. The things of this world can become overwhelming and meaningless to those who are grieving a great loss but knowing God can help to overcome all difficulties of life.

Anger

Anger is the second stage of grief. According to Kubler-Ross when a patient can no longer maintain the denial stage, they enter into the stage of anger, rage and resentment and start questioning everyone and everything (Roy,A.). Job cursed the day he was born. Job3:16 illustrate his frustration and he felt that death would be easier to endure than his grief. Job is angry and felt betrayed by God. Job’s anger becomes obvious and can be seen in Job 7:11-15. According to Kubler- Ross, anger is a defense used against the primary feelings of hopelessness and helplessness (grief.com). Job is defending himself by showing his anger to ease his pain of loss. But even in his anger, Job maintains communication with God. The feeling of anger may be towards anyone, may be a person who didn’t attend the funeral, doctors, other family members, loved one who have passed (grief.com). It is natural to feel pain and deserted in this stage and finds it hard to accept the loss.

Bargaining

In this stage, feeling of guilt is common and trying to blame it on ourselves and questioning selves for things that could have been done different to prevent the loss. A grieving person may bargain or try to negotiate a compromise to ease their pain and try to do anything to not feel the pain of loss. For example, a Hindu friend of mine once wrote a letter to Billy Graham indicating to heal her dying mother from cancer and if the mother lives then she will convert to Christianity. That was a bargain and it did not work.

Job is bargaining with God in chapter 13:20-21,” Only two things do not do to me, and then I will not hide myself from You. Withdraw your Hand far from me. And let not the dread of you make me afraid” (The Christian Life Bible). For Job, blaming God and everyone seemed natural due to the fear of taking responsibility for what has happened (faiththerapy.org). Job wants to put an end to his suffering, but instead he bowed down in humility and trusting more in God. Job did not listen to his wife’s plea to curse God and to die, but he remained in submission to God’s plan in his life.

Depression

According to Kubler-Ross, grief becomes deeper in this stage and feelings of emptiness and intense sadness and loss of hope invades life. When bargaining does not help, the reality of depression sets in. This is a noticeable stage as people are down and uncertain about their future. The loss of a loved one is heart breaking and a stage of depression is considered normal and appropriate in a healthy grieving process by Kubler-Ross (grief.com). It shows that the person has at least begun to accept the reality. Job 7:6 reads,” My days are swifter than a waver’s shuttle, and are spent without hope.” (The Christian Life Bible). Job is facing sadness about the situation that he is facing which is not under his control. Even though Job was depressed he never ran from God’s presence. Job 42:5-6 reads “I have heard of You by the hearing of the ear, But now my eye sees You. Therefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes (The Christian Life Bible).

Acceptance

During this stage according to Kubler-Ross, the person has accepted the reality of the loss of their loved ones and realizes that fighting is not going to make any difference. The loved one is no more physically present and that it is a permanent loss. Past is gone and a new future is set in front to run the race in the absence of the loved one. Job is also finally accepting the fact of his total loss and tries to resolve and come into a trusting relationship with God. In chapter 38 of Job, it displays the fact that Job finally heard from God again. This is an essential step in the grief process to restore relationships and to come in terms with life and meaning to move on with life. Through acceptance, God blessed Job again with more blessings than before and ultimately he regains his strength back. Job 42:10 reads” And the Lord restored Job’s loses when he prayed for his friends. Indeed the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before.”(The Christian Life Bible).

Conclusion

From the grief model of Kubler-Ross and the story of Job from the Bible it is clear that grief is a natural process that everyone endures at some point of their life. From the theory of Kubler –Ross, the author points out that a person may or may not go through all the stages during a grieving process and the duration may not be the same and will depend on how one handles grief in their life. The component of faith is not central to Kubler-Ross’s grieving process. Job responds to his grieving situations as a normal person would respond but his tremendous faith in God enables him to overcome all obstacles and regain his joy in life. His faith alone in God carried him through such devastating times.

This understanding can become a tremendous source of strength when we find ourselves facing the unthinkable. Job was a man of great integrity who loved the Lord deeply and his faith was genuine, personal and deep. Grieving is a personal experience and how a person grieves depends on their coping style, faith and the nature of loss. It is important to take care of the physical and emotional needs during a grieving process. Unresolved grief can lead to serious consequences in life that can create health problems such as depression, anxiety and substance abuse (helpguide.org). The grieving process takes time and healing happens gradually. Whatever grief a person experiences, it is important to be patient and allow the process to unfold naturally and not to be forced or hurried.

References
Biblical Answers for Grief. Faith Therapy. Retrieved from
http://www.faiththerapy.org/Grief%20Topic.html
Coping with Grief and Loss. Understanding the Grieving Process. Retrieved from
http://www.helpguide.org/mental/grief_loss.htm
Kubler-Ross Five Stages Model. Retrieved from
http://www.change-management-coach.com/kubler-ross.html
Roy, A. (1991). The Book of Job: A Grief and Human Development Interpretation.
Journal of Religion and Health, 30(2). Retrieved from
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00988704
The Five Stages of Grief. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross & David Kessler. Retrieved from
http://grief.com/the-five-stages-of-grief/
The Christian Life Bible (1998). Thomas Nelson Publishers.

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Healthy Grief Essay

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Healthy Grief Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1040

  • Pages: 4

Healthy Grief

Grief is an inner sense of loss, feeling of emptiness and sadness every human being experience at some point of life and each person feels and handles it differently. But there are some common stages of grief which starts from recognizing a loss to the final acceptance. It is not necessary that grief should occur after the death of a beloved one. Grief is the multifaceted response to death and losses of all kinds, including emotional (affective), psychological (cognitive and behavioral), social, and physical reactions (Stroebe, Hansson, Stroebe, & Schut, 2001).

Grief is a healthy response to a loss, which should not be prevented. But grief lasting more than two months and is severe enough to interfere with daily life may be a sign of complicated grief and more serious illness such as major depression (grief-mourning, grieving and bereavement, 2012) which has to be treated. Kubler- Ross developed the five stages of grieving process which include denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. It is not necessary that everybody will go through all these stages in the same order. Knowing all these stages will help us to cope with the loss.

Here in this paper the writer tries to compare and contrast the grieving process defined by Kubler – Ross with that of the grieving process of Job in the Bible, and tries to relate the findings with that of the writer’s own preferred method of handling grief and see whether this research has changes the view of grief. According to the Bible, Job was an obedient, god-fearing man, who was blessed with wealth, health and wisdom. One day Job lost all his wealth, health and possessions, including his children. In addition to that Job had developed very bad sores all over his body.

This all was because God was challenging the Satan with Job’s faith and obedience. But finally Satan failed. Even after all those terrible loss happened in his life, Job never turned against God, but he turned towards Him and worshiped Him saying, “Naked I came out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return there. Yahweh gave, and Yahweh has taken away. Blessed be Yahweh’s name” (Job 1:22). While comparing Kubler-Ross’s stages of grief with that of Job’s story, the first stage would have been denial which helps to survive the loss.

But there was no biblical narration that says Job use denial as a part of his grieving process. Instead he was asking his wife, “Shall we indeed accept good from God and not accept trouble? ”(Job 2:10). In stage two, when all these losses occurred one would usually get angry towards self, others, or towards God. Here Job neither got angry towards others or the God, but he got angry toward himself and cursed the day he was born. The third stage is the stage of bargaining, where someone bargains to get the life back as it was before.

Job did not go to that stage even after his wife tells him to “renounce God and die”. In the fourth stage or the stage of depression Job did withdrew from his life and it is evidenced in the chapter 2: 11, 12 that he was sitting in the ashes for seven days and nights since his grief was so great and he was not even talking to his three friends who were sitting with him for those seven days and nights. In the final stage of acceptance, one usually accepts the loss. Here in Job’s example he was accepting whatever God has given him without questioning. He didn’t say any words against Him.

He believed that the God does have a plan and He will do the right thing. Once Satan got failed Job was provided with all his wealth and health in double and he was blessed with ten children and lived a long life. The five stages of grief are not definite for each person and it does not occur as a linear fashion in everybody’s life. For example some people may get angry first then acceptance and depression. It depends on each persons living circumstances. it is different for each person.

The same way grief can occur in a caregiver’s life too, especially during end-stage care. t is necessary to identify the signs and integrate these normal response to life Grief is not only about pain. Even in grief it can be mixed with joy. In an uncomplicated grief process, painful experiences are intermingled with positive feelings, such as relief, joy, peace, and happiness that emerge after the loss of an important person (Zisook &Shear 2009). Frequently, these positive feelings elicit negative emotions of disloyalty and guilt in the bereaved. The writer considers healthy grief as a normal response and it will help to ease the stress and people show it differently.

But any signs of prolonged grief should be taken care of seriously and get the support needed. Nurses’ grief resulting from the death of a patient is different from the grief experienced by the family. It may be hard to remain strong for the patient and family, while at the same time compartmentalizing the pain they feel for the loss of relationship with the patient and family. in the article, “creating a curtain of protection: nurses’ experiences of grief following patient death”, the authors says that nurses’ coping response incorporate spiritual worldview and caring rituals and nurses reate a curtain of protection to mitigate the grieving process and allow them to continue to provide supportive nursing care.

In conclusion healthy grief is a normal response to a death or loss and knowing the different stages of grief will help to cope with the loss. The different stages occur differently for each person. Knowing the stages of grief will help the caregivers also to identify the signs of grief and help to cope with that. In a healthcare environment, the nurses have to be strong enough to support the patient and family and should be able to compartmentalize the pain they feel for the patient and family.

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