Frankenstein Essay

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Frankenstein Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 843

  • Pages: 3

Frankenstein

In the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley creates an interest in human life but the interest in human life comes after death. Human life has lengthened due to the successes of scientists in the region of medical science. Extending human life became the goal of an scientist named Victor Frankenstein. Beyond wanting to extend life, he also desired to prevent future deaths of countless innocent people and to diminish the concept of death itself. Following Frankenstein, scientists at MIT began researching ways to advance life. After many years Frankenstein’s goals and ambitions of extending human life continue, as scientists conduct research on cloning and regenerating body parts to help mankind live longer. As an scientist, Victor knows his responsibility is to help mankind; however, if he is unable to discover something that will, at least his research should lay a base for other scientists. “My operations might be incessantly baffled, and at last my work be imperfect; yet, when I considered the improvement which every day takes place in science and mechanics, I was encouraged to hope my present attempts would at least lay the foundations of future successes” (P 43).

By that quote, the reader can see that Frankenstein’s desire to interfere with nature can not be blamed, because his job as a scientist is to guarantee the survival of humankind. His commitment and ambition should be praised as he explains that, “In other studies you go as far as others have gone before you, and there is nothing more to know, but in a scientific pursuit there is continual food for discovery and wonder” (P 62). He understands there are many possibilities in the field of science and he knows all he has to do is experiment with those possibilities. If Frankenstein had not experimented in the 1800s, scientists would not have achieved as much as they have today in the areas of cloning and creating human body parts. To prove the importance of testing science to its limits, he boldly states, “yet with how many things are we upon the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries” (P 65). The scientist within Frankenstein prompts him to create his monster, and does not see himself as playing God whereas Shelley portrays him as playing God. Shelley believed that science does help mankind in multiple ways but theres a line that many scientist cross and end up going too far.

She interprets this feeling towards science with Frankenstein by creating an driving force within him to help mankind conquer death and diseases. But when he finally reaches his goal of his efforts and sees his creature and its ugliness, he turns away from it and flees the monstrosity he created, “How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavoured to form?” (P 72). From that moment on he tries to suppress the consequences of his experiments and wants to escape them by working in other sciences. Victor even withdraws from his friends and psychological changes are visible. Shelley seems not to condemn the act of creation but rather Frankenstein’s lack of willingness to accept the responsibility for his deeds. His creation only becomes a monster at the moment his creator deserts it. Thus Frankenstein warns of the careless use of science. On the other hand, scientists at MIT begun working with human tissue to create artificial human body parts for replacement therapy, where scientist carefully and thoroughly monitor the factors of this creation. “We can use this heart tissue and use it on a person who is having problems with his heart” states a researcher in an MIT documentary (The Science of IPS Cells). The quote emphasizes that although scientists seem to change the way of God creations, this benefits the human race by saving lives.

Frankenstein wants to stop people from dying, and after discovering the secret of life, he experiments, so someone else can be saved. Scientists today almost do the same thing as Frankenstein; they have found ways to extend life but if they fail at this, they retrace their steps and go through the process again to fix mistakes unlike Victor. In conclusion, Dr. Victor Frankenstein became a founder for the successes in medical science today. He should not be criticized for playing God and tampering with nature, instead he should be credited for experimenting to extend human life today. Without his experiments medical science would not be as advanced as it is now, and scientists would not have the challenge to start their research. Researchers at MIT know that Frankenstein is right in his ambition to advance human life, thus they and other scientists today continue to research in the field of life. Shelley successfully places herself in the mind of an scientist with the creation Frankenstein.

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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 520

  • Pages: 2

Frankenstein

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, encompasses every definition of a tragic hero. A tragic hero is not the normal hero a reader always envisions, but rather a character that causes suffering to others. This is shown through Victor Frankenstein himself in this novel.

Victor Frankenstein would be classified as a tragic hero in this novel because of his choice to “play God”. This is shown through him creating the Creature. He knew that this could be dangerous, but he continued to work as if nothing could go wrong for over two sleepless years. He assembled the Creature, hoping that it would be able to help humankind, and be his friend when no one else would. Victor was terrified of the Creature. “I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being that I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bed-chamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep”(30). This quote shows how horrific he perceived the “monster” he had just created. Victor begins to wonder why he had spent so much time creating the Creature, and why he had thought that he would help mankind. Although Victor saw the Creature as a monster, the Creature wanted nothing more than to be loved and wanted by his creator.

When the Creature was denied the love and affection he so longed, he did become a killing machine. “ Character, English-language films, At that moment he sees a gigantic figure illuminated by a bolt of lightning… and he instinctively realizes that that it was the Creature who killed his brother William” (Kelley). After the death of William and Justine, and the woman accused of killing William and was sentenced to death for it, the Frankenstein family went on a vacation to the mountains, where Victor runs into the Creature. The Creature describes himself as “miserable beyond all living things”, and that misery made him a friend. The monster makes a request of Victor to listen to his story and was hopeful that Victor will understand his position. The Creature requests that Victor make him a mate, and if he does, he will run away with her and never return. Victor agrees to construct a mate for Creature, but abandons this in the middle of the project. This could show how much of a tragic hero that Victor really is. Since he abandoned the female monster, the original creature kills his best friend, Henry, and his wife, Elizabeth.

If Victor Frankenstein had only cared more about the Creature and mankind other than himrself, there might have been a happy ending to the novel. But since this was not true, the novel ended in tragedy, further explaining the role Victor Frankenstein had on the plot as a tragic hero.

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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 777

  • Pages: 3

Frankenstein

In “Frankenstein”, Mary Shelley exemplifies each woman as submissive and disposable. Three ideas that present Shelley’s point of view are that women are seen as possessions, female characters are used only to mirror the male characters, and that women in the novel are portrayed as the representative women of the time period. Female characters like Elizabeth, Justine, Margaret, Safie, and Agatha serve a specific purpose in the novel. The creation and planned destruction of the monster were surrounded by the actions of two main female characters, which strengthen the importance of their influence upon Victor Frankenstein.

Frankenstein’s father first met Caroline Beaufort while she was taking care of her dying father “with the greatest tenderness”. She is first female encountered in the novel and becomes a model around which many of the other females are based. Caroline is the exception to the other women in the novel because she is not as innocent and passive as them, she acts righteously and sacrifices her life when she aids Elizabeth to recover from a severe case of scarlet fever. Elizabeth’s submissive nature represents how she becomes like a puppet to Victor.

She is described as a possession rather than an individual and was treated as though she was not capable of making her own decisions and needed a man to guide her. Frankenstein admits, “I looked upon Elizabeth as mine” and the fact that she must be “owned” in such a way suggests her weakness and vulnerability. A key character that is seen in the novel is the Frankenstein’s servant, Justine. She has a character that is very passive and is the one who rarely speaks in the novel.

Justine is framed for the murder of William Frankenstein and even in the face of the greatest injustice, she never put up a violent struggle to fight for her life. Justine willingly took the death penalty for a crime she had nothing to do with. Her silence symbolizes how she is commanded to act quietly and shyly since she is a woman. The next female character encountered is Agatha. She is a kind and gentle female and her purpose is to exhibit compassion and righteousness.

Agatha’s female character serves to teach the monster about love and human relationships. The monster’s next lesson comes from another female close to Agatha, Safie. She arrives from Arabia and must be tutored to learn English. Safie’s lessons become his own as well; she is a tool for his education, becoming yet another passive female character. Finally, Margaret’s character has the most passive role of all. Does she really exist? Does she ever read the story or gets the letters? Does she have anything to say about it?

Margaret’s character is questionable; she is the most distant and passive female character in the novel and also the most necessary to the novel as a whole. Both Victor and the monster share the same views of women. At the beginning the woman were an object of desire but eventually they turn into objects of revenge. For them, a woman is vital since these provide comfort and acceptance. Elizabeth provides the joy that can alleviate Victor’s guilty conscience of creating such a dreadful monster, and this is similar to what the monster is looking for in a companion.

But the monster pursues a female so he will not feel guilty about his horrible existence. Having a female companion will make him feel better about himself and also, provide someone who will be at his side. Throughout Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”, various views of women and their role in society are presented. And although the female characters in Frankenstein are not given significant importance in a direct way, their influence upon Victor Frankenstein drives the entire plot.

Mary Shelley wrote from three different perspectives, using three narrators, all male. The contrast between the male and female characters in the novel is very clear; the male characters are described in great detail and they have voices, which they use to tell their stories with. All female characters are described in little detail; therefore this reduces their importance in the novel. The perception of women, especially Frankenstein’s, is a key element of the book. In short, the female characters in the play are essential to understand Frankenstein’s nature.

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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1425

  • Pages: 6

Frankenstein

Throughout the novel, Frankenstein, a feminist theme subtly pervades the novel, and is crucial to the characters of the story, the plot line and the setting of the novel. The reasons for the creation of the monster lie within Frankenstein’s own familial relationships, especially with the grief he experienced at the loss of his mother. Frankenstein is riddled with passive female characters who suffer throughout the novel. However, not one female character throughout the novel ever exhibits behaviour outside of the submissive female role.

Elizabeth, Victor’s love, dies at the hand of the male creature, while waiting for Victor to rescue her. Elizabeth is unable to do anything to defend herself without the help of a man. Equally, Justine Moritz is sentenced to death for a murder the creature also committed. Once again, she is unable to defend herself and prove her innocence and dies for it. Some may argue that Justine is a victim of circumstance however, but her docile role leaves her helpless to make her own destiny and defend herself against the false accusation.

Mary Shelley’s own family life affected contents of the novel as well. Her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, a strong activist in the feminist movement, had died shortly after her own birth, and both her and her sister did not take kindly to their Father’s second wife, Mary Clairmont. During the nineteenth century, within Genevan society, where the novel was first written, men dominated the social and intellectual employment, whilst women only occupied the domestic work/lifestyle.

Although the passivity of female characters is at a constant throughout the novel, perhaps coming to the conclusion that Frankenstein is simply a misogynistic text is unreasonable. Shelley’s feminist background, as a daughter of Wollstonecraft, questions the motives behind stereotyping traits of all of the female characters in the novel. Also, Elizabeth and Justine both died far before the end of the novel. It can be argued that by emphasising the conservative qualities of the characters, Shelley was able to also define the negative aspects of the static female ole by exterminating female characters that fit that role.

By linking the submissive women with the negative demises, Shelley was able to emphasise the negative outcomes of their behaviour, contrasting with feminist ideals that would have in turn saved the character in each case. It can be debated that Shelley’s presentation of women after Caroline Beaufort’s death is the irreplaceable place of a mother or the assumption of roles by other characters. In the novel, Shelley seems to portray Caroline’s death as society’s view of women.

Caroline is easily discarded, performs the role of the mother and then perishes. The women in Frankenstein could also be seen as virtuous and caring, as Caroline sacrifices her own health knowingly in order to look after Justine and Elizabeth; “Elizabeth was saved, but the consequences of this imprudence were fatal to her preserver. ” Elizabeth appears to represent a replacement mother figure within the Frankenstein family, spurred on by dying request of Caroline for her to “supply” her place to her “younger children”.

Agatha, as well, supplies this need within the DeLacey family by playing the womanly role. However, it is argued by some that a mother can never be truly replaced, and according to the maternal and biblical symbolism throughout this novel, the reader could be inclined to believe this is Shelley’s true opinion. Mary Shelley’s own mother died only eleven days after her birth, and it could be seen that the absence of a maternal figure is clear in Frankenstein.

The absence of the maternal figure shows the apparent breakdown of a family unit and seems to inspire an oedipal complex within both Frankenstein and the monster. Like in Frankenstein, the role of men in Brave New World has a complete higher standing to women, both physically and psychologically. Also in comparison to Frankenstein, women have a better understanding of emotions and have more social roles. The portrayal of male superiority is uniform throughout the novel, and starts by introducing that overall dominance with the tour of the Hatchery.

All the students on the tour are male and although maybe a minor detail, this shows that women are restricted to the things they do at an early age. During the tour, the students learn about pregnancies and that women are sterilised, yet the men aren’t. This short and important fact by the author exclaims the physiological dominance of men over women. The book shows no clear objection to leaving the future of their offspring in the hands of males, even if it is unhealthy. A specific character to talk about in Brave New World is Linda.

Linda is the character in the novel who opposes the traditional role of women in the book (and that of women in Frankenstein). Like in a lot of Huxley’s pieces, this novel centres heavily around sex. In Brave New World, sex is no longer used for procreation but for distraction and pacification. The act has been dehumanised and devoid of human passion. I feel in this, Huxley tries to argue whether the future of our lifestyle is a subjugation of a natural inclination toward monogamy or the freedom of sleeping with many people.

Linda is portrayed as the person opposing to modern culture, and causes the reader to question whether Huxley’s portrayal of women in Brave New World is apt. For her opposition to the modern culture, Linda is isolated, condemning her and her son to a marginal existence because of this. Another female character worth mentioning in Brave New World is Lenina Crowne, the main female character in the novel. Foster, Bernard and John are in awe of this woman, and it is puzzling to see why. She lacks intelligence, and is not particularly creative, interesting or unique.

A word that Huxley uses constantly is “pneumatic”. The official definition of this is ‘full of air’, which seems to mean she is curvy and all-round sexy. It could be argued that Aldous Huxley purposely used this word as a double meaning, that she’s pneumatic mentally also; she’s vapid (lifeless and dull). In contrast to Linda in the novel, Huxley’s constant use of “pneumatic” implies that she’s the epitome of the World State female. I feel it is clear throughout the novel, and corresponding to her previous upbringing and family, Frankenstein works as an indication to the treatment of women during that time.

Her portrayal of inferior women is ironic given she is the daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft. Elizabeth could be seen as a sign of mistreatment to women as she is portrayed as the perfect woman who represents domestic bliss and harmony, while rejected by Victor Frankenstein in his “pursuit of knowledge”. The role of Elizabeth during the novel could work as a feminist warning also, as she magnifies Victor’s selfish character; “my more than sister, since till death she was to be mine only. Likewise, in Brave New World, Aldous Huxley could have written the novel in order to show the wrong attitude towards women during the story. This could trigger spite towards the limits that women are still treated at, or were treated at when the novel was written. In conclusion to the two texts, the theme of feminism is still very relevant to the plot line in this modern age, although both works have been continuously adapted into different stories, plays and movies.

Both Huxley and Shelley represent their female characters as inferior to and reliant on men, as well as more emotional in both texts. I feel both the authors represent their female roles like this, and in a negative light, to receive a reaction from the reader; in order to think of how women are still treated in today’s society and back then. The fact that Frankenstein is still present in literature, theatre, and cinema attests to the perpetuity of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and her views on feminism in society.

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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 782

  • Pages: 3

Frankenstein

Throughout the years, Hollywood has been notorious for taking classic novels, and turning them into big blockbuster movies. However, in order for Hollywood to make money, they feel the need to make drastic changes to the characters and plot so that the average everyday moviegoer will be entertained. Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus is no exception to this and it can be shown through the many different movies that have been adapted from Mary Shelly’s timeless novel. In the original text, Frankenstein’s monster is portrayed as an intelligent creature that can run like a gazelle and can speak eloquently.

However, Hollywood’s version is very different and many differences can be pointed out through the novel. For example, in the novel Frankenstein, the monster speaks eloquently with an impressive vocabulary. Victor Frankenstein encounters the monster on a glacier and the monster speaks with an educated vocabulary when it says, “Remember, that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded.

I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous. ” (87) The way the creature speaks and how knowledgeable it makes itself out to be highly contrasts the monster in movies such as Boris Karloff’s adaption in Frankenstein where the monster or as it is incorrectly named, Frankenstein, does not even speak English and instead simply groans and does not have any grasp of knowledge. Hollywood directors know that people do not want to watch a movie with an intelligent being because it is not as entertaining.

People prefer to watch movies about mindless creatures because it is an escape from reality and the original creature is just too normal for the average person’s taste. Another way that the creature in the novel differs from Hollywood’s version is the time the creature spends observing the Delacey family. The family consists of a man, woman, and an old man. The creature spends his time stealing their food but as he observes them, he begins to realize that they are an unhappy family, mainly because of their poverty.

The creature realizes that they are poor because he steals their food and because of his guilty conscience, he stops stealing their food. This version of the monster is extremely different than the monster shown on the silver screen. This creature actually has a conscience and knows right from wrong. The “Frankenstein” from the movies however does not have a conscience and is portrayed as killing machine with no remorse. After realizing what it was doing, the creature instead helps the family by gathering wood for them and leaving it outside their door at night.

Not only does the creature have a conscience, but he also has good intentions. The creature knows that he has done wrong, so he feels that he can make it up to them by helping them gather wood. This dramatic difference between “Hollywood’s Frankenstein” and Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein makes one wonder how desperate for money Hollywood is that they can destroy such a complex, intelligent character in order to make money. There are many differences between the creature from Hollywood blockbusters and the original monster from Mary Shelly.

Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein portrays the creature as an intelligent being that has a conscience and has educated himself. On the other hand, the creature in the movies is a ruthless killing machine. Movies such as Boris Karloff’s adaption takes away the novel’s integrity in order make money. If a director were to make a movie that portrayed Frankenstein’s monster in the way it was written, the movie probably would not make any money because when people go to the movies, they go to be entertained and captivated.

The reason why the Frankenstein movies have done so well is because they were made to scare moviegoers. Mary Shelly’s creature is not scary in that sense, and nobody would ever pay to see a movie where the monster is intelligent and tries to be accepted by society. However, Hollywood has destroyed Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein so much throughout the years that when people imagine Frankenstein’s monster, they no longer imagine the intelligent creature it was made to be.

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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1508

  • Pages: 6

Frankenstein

Frankenstein was originally written by Mary Shelley in 1818. In 1818 scientists were discovering many different scientific revolutions. One thing they discovered was vaccination. People at that time were both very scared and excited about this. Shelley’s novel was inspired by Galvini who used electricity to move a late criminal’s hand jaw. Also Mary was influenced by her father and her husband’s view of life, who were both radical thinkers. Mary’s story was brought to life after long days and nights during her holiday when she entered a horror competition.

She wrote her initial draft from a nightmare she had. Without Galvini, the holiday, nightmare, her father and her husband then this story wouldn’t have been brought to life. In the play which is adapted by Phillip Pullman. We feel empathy and sympathy for various characters throughout. The two main characters I feel sympathy and empathy towards are Frankenstein and the monster. We feel sorry for these characters in different places in the play. But who do we really feel sorry for? We initially feel sorry for Frankenstein.

For example Frankenstein had a lack of care for his own health. For instance he spent all his money on chemicals and not for himself. We know this because in the play it quotes “No, no fire I keep it cold on purpose- it’s the only way to preserve my specimens. ” This implies that Frankenstein thinks his specimens are more important than his own health and well-being that he resulted into living in the cold. This also shows how much Frankenstein was devoted into creating the monster and didn’t let the cold stop him from achieving his goals of creating life.

It also shows how much he loves the monster. This makes the reader feel sympathy towards Frankenstein as it makes them feel like Frankenstein how he put his own health at major risk just because of his life ambition and has resulted to adapt to the cold. We also feel sorry for victor because of the death of William. For example “You killed my little brother! Is that love? Is that good will? ” This make the reader feel sympathy for victor as he’s lost a loved one who was killed by the person he had created.

On the other hand it makes us understand upon victors opinion towards the monster as everything victor witnesses and everything the monster does it appears evil. This makes it acceptable for victor’s opinion towards the monster. However it’s not the monsters fault because when the monster was born the first thing he received was hatred and the more hatred he got the more it drove him to be evil. The monster was judged by his looks which appeared evil and this drove him to do evil actions which led the monster looking even bad. I also blame victor for playing the role of god.

As victor has no right in creating life and death and questioning God by saying “if lightning can kill someone it can bring someone alive. ” Victor knew that he had neglected Elizabeth because he was so preoccupied with creating the monster. In the novel it quotes “No Elizabeth don’t- you’re right, I’ll come back with you but my work. You don’t understand it’s reached I’ve been working towards for six years. ” This tell us that Frankenstein had realised how he had treated Elizabeth with rudeness, he instantly agrees to go see his father but insists on finishing the monster as he had been working on it for 6 years.

This makes the reader feel sympathy for victor because he had devoted most of his life on the monster and at the end everything goes wrong. On the other hand what was the purpose of creating life and this also showed how he thought the monster was more important than his very own father at the time of need, he could have took a break as he has been working constantly for 6 years and to see his father who was at his death bed. On the other hand we also feel empathy for the monster.

For example the monster was unloved from the start. For example “But you’re not what I thought you’d be. ” This suggests that Frankenstein’s was disappointed in his very own creature he has devoted 6 years for and didn’t accept the monster the way he was but instead judged him on his appearance as soon as he laid eyes on him. Frankenstein prejudged the monster by looking at him to be ruthless and evil but it also shows that Frankenstein wanted the best for his monster and wanted it to be perfect like an angel.

The word angel suggest that Frankenstein wanted pure beauty but instead he discriminated the monster which made the monster feel neglected and disowned, he had a perfect deal of what a human should be. People judged the monster on his appearance and not his personality. I know this because “Felix runs in, sees the monster apparently attacking her and Agatha struggling to be free and without hesitation seizes the musket. ” The stage direction suggests that soon s Felix comes in and he sees the monster and tries to shoot him because he apparently thought the monster was attacking Agatha.

The word “without hesitation” suggests that as soon as Felix saw the monster and judged he was up to evil and he quickly got the musket and didn’t even consider the situation. Also the word “apparently” suggests that Felix prejudged the monster and the entire situation as he thought the monster was hurting Agatha but on the other hand the monster was trying to get through to Agatha as that was his only hope for a friend but Felix never listened and persisted into believing that the monster was spiteful.

This make the reader feel sympathy toward =s the monster because he had found a friend that had looked at his inner beauty and didn’t judge him but it was ruined but a person who didn’t see that inner beauty and just thought plain evil of the monster. We feel sorry for the monster because all he wants is to be loved. In the play it quotes “They’d throw stones and shouted harsh words to me but they had companions, fellows, friends. Couldn’t I find a friend? So I began to look. ” This makes the audience feel empathy towards the monster because it makes us feel how harshly the monster was treated.

He got hurt even more as he saw that everyone had friends. He wanted a friend. The quotation “Couldn’t I find a friend? ” this suggests that the monster wanted someone to support him and a person who he can laugh with like the people who were laughing at him together. This makes the reader feel sympathy towards the monster because he is lonely and isolated. The writer at this moment makes us feel how people are judged without even finding out about that person and naming the monster monster it over reacts straight way and if someone heard that they would assume bad and keep their distance.

As the word “monster” suggests evil and scary. The writer also wanted us to think about human nature. And how we look can play a big role in our life and the changes we want to make to ourselves to fit in. I believe that Mary Shelley the writer was trying to put across that the consequences of trying to play God and challenging the unknown. It also puts across about how you shouldn’t discriminate against someone cause of their appearance. Another thing that it puts across is love and how important role it plays in everyone’s life.

In my opinion I feel more sympathy for the monster because Frankenstein had no right to play God and create a living creature because it is going against God by taking his power against him which is causing life and death also saying you are as superior as god as you are creating life. The monster didn’t want to be created and as it has no family or support Frankenstein’s duty was to take care of the monster and feed him but Frankenstein just prejudged the monster and disowned him. That’s what made the monster evil at that time. It’s not his fault for turning evil and does the actions he did. So in my opinion I feel sorrier for the monster.

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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1806

  • Pages: 7

Frankenstein

According to mental health specialists, Borderline personality disorder is a serious mental illness and those afflicted have issues with regulating their emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. On top of that, they have a hard time maintaining relationships with others because of their reactions to certain situations or ideas, and are found to be “unstable”. Not unlike the men in Shelley’s Frankenstein, a person with, the somewhat misnomered, illness is very impressionable to the various occurrences in their life.

It is true that with age and as the story goes on, that the toll of being emotionally unstable and incapable of dealing with the repercussions of their actions increases and is reflected in the personalities of the men in Frankenstein. Starting with the most susceptible of the three main male characters, the Wretch has the least understanding of how the world around him works. He is seen to be pondering the realization that he has been shunned, by the one person who should accept him for who he is, and he instantly feels indignation. “… ometimes I allowed my thoughts, unchecked by reason, to ramble in the fields of Paradise and dared to fancy amiable and lovely creatures sympathising with my feelings and cheering my gloom… but.. [my creator] had abandoned me, and in the bitterness of my heart I cursed him,” (93-94). He is content with the knowledge that people are wanted and treated well by those who care, but is disappointed when he comprehends that he and the people around him are not one and the same. The Wretch struggles to come to terms with this, as he has not been prepared to deal with the cruelty of those who he instinctually admires.

The Wretch takes offense easily, and is hardened by the fact that there is so much good in the world, yet he remains unwanted. The Wretch desperately wanted to be accepted by the cottagers, and is so overcome with grief when they reject him entirely that it oversteps his anger. He is even found to say: “I could have torn him limb from limb… but my heart sunk within me as with bitter sickness, and I refrained,” (97). Sad and confused, the Wretch finds himself alone and dealing with the sudden and all-too-heavy realization that he is not wanted in the world he was brought about into.

The Wretch is child-like, not unlike his first victim, and does not have an understanding of how he is received by others. The Wretch comes across William Frankenstein, Victor’s youngest brother, and wants to be his friend; but his attempts at friendship being dodged by the youngster only confuses and hurts him further. “I could seize him and educate him as my companion and friend, I should not be so desolate in this peopled earth… the child still struggled, and loaded me with epithets which carried despair to my heart: I grasped his throat to silence him, and in a moment he lay dead at my feet,”(102).

Regrettably, The Wretch did not realize his strength and was too taken by the idea of friendship to see what he was doing. Disappointed still at the fact that a young and impressionable child was old and wise enough to know they were different, the Wretch truly feels alone and abandoned by society. Robert Walton is a man who is always changing his mind, and changing his behaviors and focuses. He realizes a new goal for himself, to travel to the Antarctic, and sets out on yet another adventure; he is relishing in the thought that he is finally content with the direction in which his life is going. These reflections have dispelled the agitation with which I began my letter, and I feel my heart glow with an enthusiasm which elevates me to heaven; for nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose–a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye,” (2). Walton is quoted several times to have said that he changed focuses in his life. He is inconsistent and fickle about his life’s goals, and never completes anything. Sure he may one day set out and finish something, but the Robert Walton depicted by Shelley and introduced to Victor Frankenstein is not that man.

Robert Walton is a simple man. who is so proud, that he can not bear to be a disappointment to anyone, including himself. While writing to his sister, Walton is addressing the fact that should he fail on his latest mission, he will be far too ashamed to face that and most likely disappear completely. “If I succeed, many, many months, perhaps years, will pass before you and I may meet: If I fail, you will see me again soon, or never,” (3). From the very beginning, Robert is displayed as a character who is unstable and very easily disappointed.

While this is not life ruining, a trait like this surely only complicates life and upsets those around him. In promising to estrange himself from his family solely because of a failure, one that has not even happened yet, Robert is painted as a man who perhaps should not be trusted. Walton’s emotions and how he reacts is everchanging, and he is quick to change his mind about a person or idea solely based on prejudice or the opinions of others. Robert allows himself to feel badly for the monster when listening to his grief over the death of Victor, but his sudden and ery deep obligation to Victor, as well as his prejudice against the Wretch, stops him. “I was first touched by the expressions of his misery; yet, when I called to mind what Frankenstein had said of his powers of eloquence and persuasion, and when I again cast my eyes on the lifeless form of my friend, indignation was rekindled within me,”(164). Perhaps Robert would have felt more strongly about the Wretch and his own story had Robert not known and immediately sided with Victor.

In lieu of assessing the situation and how he felt about the monster, Walton promptly writes off any good feelings for him, because he is an easily-influenced man, who is incapable of really thinking things through. Victor Frankenstein, towards the end of his life, is quick to anger when faced with even the thought of his creation. Robert Walton wanted to know what was plaguing the mind of his new friend, but was taken aback by how upset Victor was when questioned about the monster. After confronting him, Walton says, “As I spoke, a dark gloom spread over my listener’s countenance.

At first I perceived that he tried to suppress his emotion; he placed his hands before his eyes, and my voice quivered and failed me as I beheld tears trickle fast from between his fingers,– a groan burst from his heaving breast,” (11). Victor is a man of prestige and a scholar, to see him break down at the mention of the Wretch is largely an indicator that he is somewhat deranged. He literally breaks down and cries in front of Robert Walton, a man whom he has just been introduced to, and is so moved by his emotions that he has to excuse himself and spend the night calming himself.

Though this is early on in the novel, the actual event takes place at the end of Victor’s tale, and can later be chalked up to the fact that the creation of his monster took so much out of him, that he is a different, and highly disturbed man. Victor is taken so strongly by his emotions and devotion to his project that he jeopardizes himself and his health. Victor explains the struggles he went through to create the monster, but is so enraptured with the idea of making new life, that he dismisses these downsides. He is quoted as saying, “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body.

For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart,” (35). Taken by his convictions, Victor knows what he is doing is wrong, and continues on with them anyway. He sees that his creating the monster and tampering with life is wrong, but goes through with it because his want to succeed is much greater than the battle within him over how morally right or wrong it is.

As the novel progresses, this eats away at Victor, as he feels so badly about what he’s done. Victor abhors the creation he has made because he is a man who lets impressions fog his view of others. Victor himself feels a general sadness when he hears the tale of the Wretch, because not unlike Victor, nor any other “living” man, the Wretch has feelings. However, Victor openly admits that: “I compassionated him and sometimes felt a wish to console him; but when I looked upon him, when I saw the filthy mass that moved and talked, my heart sickened and my feelings were altered to those of horror and hatred,” (106).

This reflects poorly on Victor, as he is the man who created the Wretch. To feel horror and hatred at one’s own creation, one whom many liken to a son of Frankenstein’s, is abominable of Victor. Victor is just a man who is incapable of looking past his preju. dices and accepting the wrongs he has done. Knowing what kind of man he is, he should not have gone through with the making of the Wretch at all.

However, the drive to accomplish something great and be renown for his advancement in the science community, as well as an arguably deep-rooted want to be distinguished and intellectual, proved to be much greater than any compunction from creating life and tampering with something so delicate as the human emotion. The Wretch, Robert, and Victor are all men who are shown as developing and complex characters. Their decisions and ultimately the way they handle the consequences of their actions is what makes the men of Frankenstein emotionally unstable.

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Frankenstein Essay

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Frankenstein Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 482

  • Pages: 2

Frankenstein

Within the story of Mary Shelley’s, Frankenstein, we meet a character who comes head on with the advancements of science and the evolution of man. Victor Frankenstein is obsessed with the idea of creating life. He struggles with his own intelligence and the morality of the society around him. He is continuously bothered by the accepted laws of nature. The significance of his statement, “Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction” he finally realizes that his efforts to create and sustain life were no match for the powers of nature.

It is upon returning to school after the near death of Elizabeth and the death of his mother that he becomes obsessed with creating life. Victor makes the statement “I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation”. (pg 33) This after hearing a lecture of modern chemistry by Professor M. Waldman. Over a period of time Victor collected a series of body parts from graveyards to assemble in a new human form. With his knowledge of chemistry, biology and anatomy he reanimated his creation into an eight- foot monster.

After bringing life to his eight foot creation, Victor realizes he should not have gone against the laws of nature. Victor is horrified to realize his creation has murdered his brother William. Victor cannot explain his creation and its evilness to his family without them thinking he is mentally ill. Victor nearly goes mad with the realization that because of his creature, his brother is killed. Falsely accused of Williams’s murder, Justine is executed after hard evidence unfolds upon her. Because of his obsession of creating life, he has taken life away.

In his depression, Victor decides that his creature must be found and destroyed. Natures Laws should not have been toyed with. Victor sets out on an expedition in the mountains and finds the monster. To his surprise the monster seems to be intelligent and refined, but the monster has resentment of Victor for having been sent out on his own with no one to teach or nurture him. It was because of the monsters resentment that ultimately William and Justine were killed.

Victor’s scientific ambition consumed his life. To go against the Law of Nature to prove that man can create life. Mental and physical setbacks plagued Victor while dealing with the reality of his creation. He suffers because his passion for creating life has taken away those around him that he loved. The significance of his statement, “Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction” he finally realizes that his efforts to create and sustain life were no match for the powers of nature.

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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 3759

  • Pages: 15

Frankenstein

Mary Shelley wrote the novel Frankenstein. The novel is also known as the modern Prometheus. Mary Shelley, her husband Percy and Lord Byron went to Lake Geneva. Lord Byron challenged the group to a ghost story. After that Mary Shelley had a dream which then made her start writing her ghost story. Her dream was of a boy which made a machine, a man, which showed signs of life. Mary then had the basis of her story and went on to complete the novel in 1817 and published it in 1818, in London when she was 18 years old.

Another thing which influenced Mary in writing Frankenstein was Jean Jacques Rousseau, a French philosopher, writer and composer in the 18th century. She was deeply motivated by his thoughts and dreams. Her description in Frankenstein closely resembles her documentations of Rousseau’s wanderings throughout his days of exile. This probably gave her an idea of making the monster alone after her idea of a man made human machine.

Also Mary knew that Rousseau abandoned his children to an orphanage which Mary disapproved of, but I think this gave her the idea of Victor abandoning his creation, this also happened to Mary when she was young and it also happened to Rousseau when he was young. They were both dreamers, yet outcasts and both found inspiration in loneliness and isolation. The novel Frankenstein is also called the modern Prometheus. The reason why the novels subtitle is called the modern Prometheus is because in Greek mythology, Prometheus was the titan who stole fire from god and gave it to man.

Victor stole the secret of creation of life from god in a way because he created a being in the likeness of a man. He stole this ‘fire’ or power and bought it to man just like Prometheus did. Mary Shelley evokes a sense of horror when Victor Frankenstein says in (chapter 5): “It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. ” This was when Victor creates life, a being in the likeness of a man.

‘Dreary’ could be dull, gloomy and evil. She included the month of November to show that it is near the end of the year and it creates a dark setting. November’ is also a cold, dreary month. It is before December (the last month of the year) so it could mean before death. ‘Beheld’ is carrying out or something which you have already carried out. It can create a sense of dread because the thing being carried out could be an evil thing which was carried out. The word ‘accomplishment’ can be victory, creation or achievement. It could be victory or achievement of the creation of something evil which creates the dread. In this case it was the achievement of creating life. ‘Toils’ is the hard work and hard work is work which is done over a long time.

So if it is work done over a long period of time, than it gives you the feeling that something wicked is being created behind all the hard work. The second link is that Prometheus was the one who made humans, just like Victor did from scratch. This had lot in common with the classic Prometheus; the dream and the creation of a new species; the disregard of limits. “I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs. ” The point where the new being had started its life also creates a sense of fear.

‘Dull’ is gloomy, dreary, evil and deadly. Yellow’ is a colour most commonly used in dangerous and dreadful creatures for the eyes and body so it makes the monster look bloodcurdling. The words ‘open’ and ‘breathed hard’ give the feeling of something is going to happen, a feeling of tension and suspense because it is the first breath of another human created and we do not know what is going to happen. ’Convulsive’ is the jerky muscular contractions resembling a spasm. It can also be the sudden violent movement of rage. It gives us a sense of terror because of the sudden violent movement; you do not know what the monster will do because he is a new creation.

Agitated’ is disturbed or trouble. His limbs were troubled and agitated. You can also see it as being in a state of anxiety and not being calm, vigorously shaking back and forth and being restless. It can mean that the monster was impatient and keen to do something. Shelley creates this sense of horror in chapter 5 by making us feel that the monster is an evil person by describing him ‘dull’ and ‘yellow’. Also it creates horror because the monster has sudden violent movements as soon as he is born and is vigorously shaking because of his distressed state. There are 10 elements of a gothic novel.

These are: set in castle, which often contains secret passages and hidden parts. Some of Frankenstein is set in darkness and horror for example when before Victor created the monster; he spent nights in churchyards and charnel houses collecting remains of dead bodies in places of dark and ghostly atmosphere. Here Shelley creates the horror. “As I dabbled among the unhallowed damps of the grave” ‘Dabbled’ can be when you dip your hand or foot into a liquid. But it can also be when someone plays around with their work and experiment things. ’Unhallowed’ is the opposite of hollow, so it is something which is not empty inside.

It can also be seen as someone treating something with disrespect or violating the sacredness of something, to remove something from the grave. ‘Damp’ is something which has moisture, a slight wetness on an object. This is related to the gothic element of a setting in darkness or castle. So here, Victor is playing around with the bodies, trying to get a perfect body for his creation when he is dabbling. You can tell it is a body he wants because unhallowed is when it is not empty, and the graves are not empty because they have dead bodies which could be slight wet because they are in the ground.

He is raising a body from a grave in a dark graveyard to create a new life. This is how Shelley creates the dread in this gothic element in chapter 4. An atmosphere of mystery and suspense, were fear is often enhanced by the unknown. The terrible, gloomy weather creates suspense and are also metaphors for sorrow and distress. Some gothic novels also contain ancient prophecies which could be obscure, profound or confusing. It could be omens, portents, visions or disturbing dreams like when Victor had a horrifying dream foreshadowing Elizabeth’s death.

He was dreaming of Elizabeth who was healthy, but it turned out to be his mum corpse who he was kissing. Shelley creates the sense of horror here when Victor tells of his dream after he created his creation. “I slept indeed, but I was disturbed by the wildest dreams. I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health, walking in the streets of Ingolstadt. Delighted and surprised, I embraced her, but as soon as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death; her features appeared to change, and I thought

I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms, a shroud enveloped her form, and I saw the grave-worms crawling in the folds of the flannel. ” This was the horrifying dream which Victor had in chapter 5. He thought he saw Elizabeth in the ‘bloom’ of health. A bloom can be a blossom or a flower or a seed starting to grow into a bud or flower. The dream starts off in a cheerful manner, but the fear starts to occur after he ‘embraces’ her. Embrace is when you meet someone, shake their hands, hug them or kiss them.

But when he went to ‘imprint’ the kiss on her lips the delightfulness was blown away. Imprinted’ is when you stick, print, dent, mark or impress something or someone. Here it is used as printing a kiss on her lips. ‘Livid’ is something becoming discoloured, purple, bruised, enraged or unusual. ‘Hue’ is colour, a shade or tinge of colour. The lips became discoloured and unusual; they had the shade and colour of death on them. Shelley starts to create the sense of horror here. ‘Features’ are the characteristics of something. It is something which makes up an object or thing. Elizabeth’s features are the limbs and all parts of her body like the nose and eyes.

They all started to change. ‘Corpse’ is a dead body. ‘Shroud’ is a covering, blanket, veil or cloak. ‘Enveloped’ is when something encloses on an object or when something surrounds it, an attacking force. ‘Flannel’ is a soft light piece of woollen fabric. I think Shelley used this dream to show that Victor regretted making his creation. As soon as he made it, he abandoned it. The dream was probably trying to tell Victor that he had done something very awful. Also, as soon as the dream had finished and he woke up, the monster was standing over him.

The corpse in his dream could be the monster and it could be a vision telling him that your creation will do the same to you; he will be pleasant to you at first like the ‘bloom of health’ but then turn horrific like the corpse and hate you if you turn away from him. It can also mean that Victor is Elizabeth, a lovely, determined man, but after creating the monster he turned heart-less and deadly like the corpse and it comes to hunt him. Supernatural inexplicable events, dramatic, amazing events occur. In Frankenstein, the monster is the supernatural being when he is created.

High emotion, characters are often overcome by anger, sorrow, surprise and most often, terror like in Frankenstein the monster is very heart-broken as he finds out no one loves him, even though he loves many humans, so he becomes angry, distraught and lonely. Some gothic novels also have women in distress, threatened by a powerful, tyrannical male. They also have metonymy of gloom and horrors e. g. wind, rain, moans and howls. Terrible weather used by Mary Shelley for dread and horror in Frankenstein is an example of this.

It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out. ” This was at the beginning of chapter 5 when Victor finishes creating his creation. Shelley used dreadful weather (a gothic element) and the completion of Victor’s creation at the same time to create the sense of horror. The monster opened his eyes just after the heavy rain started to beating against the panes. ’Pattered dismally’ is when the rain patters on your window in a dreadful and cheerless manner. ‘My candle was nearly burnt out’.

It tells you how dreadful the weather was. The candle was almost burnt out inside a room, and as soon as the candle was almost burnt out, the monster opened his eyes. Shelley used this in an obvious way to create tension and that dread of the horrendous weather and light being gone out from the room combined with the yellow eyes of the monster opening. The monster in Frankenstein is symbolic of many things. Misogyny is one of them. Victor left Elizabeth for his determination of learning new ideas and to feed his craving for knowledge and learning. We sat late. We could not tear ourselves away from each other, nor persuade ourselves to say the word ‘farewell! ’ It was said; and we retired under the pretence of seeking repose, each fancying that the other was deceived. ” It is symbolic of Frankenstein (the monster) because the monster stopped the doctor from being with Elizabeth. It may be a symbol of science because it is repeatedly shown in the novel as an alternative way of understanding the world to that offered by religion. The monster is a warning against scientific progress.

The creature represents this in both its power and its deformities (both physical and moral). The warning against scientific progress is shown when Victor creates a new being and all the casualties which occur after for going advance in science, like the death of Victors brother and Elizabeth, and the loneliness, isolation and being neglected causes the creature rage and sorrow, which after causes him to become evil. It may be symbolic of the parent child relationship. The monster grows up unloved, nameless and untutored-it is a moral lesson to parents about their obligations to their children.

Shelly’s tragedy is similar. She lost her mother 10 days after she was born and grew up alone most of the time, so she could be making the monster symbolic of her. It symbolises destructive nature of dangerous ambition in psychological tale. It also considers the question of whether man is born evil or made evil by society, as we see in Frankenstein, the monster is born loving and caring, but the rejection of Victor and other humans made him loose his love and was made evil by society. Shelley uses the monster to symbolise those who have lost their freedom. His purpose is political.

Frankenstein contains romanticism. The romantic period had an influence on Mary Shelley. This novel contains many elements of romance, but there are three main ones. These are powerful love, unreturned love and uncertainty of reciprocation. The monster had powerful love when he was born, he was not born evil. He loved Victor very much and begged him for the redeeming power of love. But Victor disliked the monster and abandoned him and his duty to look after his creation.

This was unreturned love, the second element, where the monster loved Victor, but he did not give the love back. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks. He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped, and rushed downstairs”. ‘Inarticulate’ is someone who is speechless, who is not speaking clearly, and hesitating and mumbling. ’grin’ is a smile, smirk or a pleasant beam. ‘Detain’ is to hold someone, arrest or capture someone. You can see this as a non-evil side and an evil side.

The negative way you can see this is the monster opening the bed curtain and fixing his eyes on Victor, as if he was going to do something to him. This is where Shelley starts to create the fear. His mouth opened to say something, he may have wanted to curse Victor or say something unpleasant towards him for creating him and then running away from him. His hand was probably stretched out to capture Victor and hold him a prisoner, before Victor runs away. I think that this is unreturned love. This is where the monster wanted to be loved, and he loved Victor.

I see this as a non-evil side. The monster opened the bed curtains to wake up Victor from his horrific dream which the monster could see because of Victor’s convulsive limbs, he wanted to help Victor. His eyes were fixed on Victor because it was the first time he ever saw him properly and wanted to be loved by him. When he opened his mouth to say something, he probably wanted to say some compassionate words and then when he stretched his hands out, he probably wanted to hold Victor and hug him for creating him; for giving him life again.

But Victor probably thought he was trying to attack him so he escaped, but I think that the monster wanted love which was not returned to him. An example of the third element is when the monster watched and studied a family of cottagers, he felt as if he was part of their family without even meeting them. Even after the cottager’s rejection, he still had hope that they would accept him. This shows the uncertainty of reciprocation, where someone is uncertain if something is going to be returned. In Frankenstein, the monster is the example of this, he is unsure if he is ever going to be loved.

The Enlightenment was a very optimistic, yet realistic, era in history. It found people rallying for major changes to take place. The attitude of the Enlightenment was to question everything and think deeply about its meaning, challenging the importance and validity of tradition. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Shelley portrays ideas about progress, optimism, liberty, fate, happiness, nature, and the physical world in a manner that supports Enlightenment attitudes. The enlightenment age encouraged everyone to use reason and science in order to rid the world of barbarism and superstition.

In Frankenstein, Shelley argues that Frankenstein’s role as an enlightenment hero, not only pulled him out of nature, but made him a slave to his creation, and that Frankenstein’s role as a revolting romantic failed, because he did not take responsibility for his creation and mankind must find a balance between the enlightenment and romantic ideologies. When Victor takes a moment to ponder upon a story from his youth, we get a glimpse at the Enlightenment view of fate. Victor recalls a time when he was fifteen and lightning not just split, but splintered, a tree near his house.

A well researched natural philosopher just happened to be with him at the time, and when he explained the scientific concepts that had destroyed the tree, Victor immersed himself in the study of mathematics and the sciences related to mathematics. “As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards issue from our house; and so soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner.

It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribands of wood. I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed. ” ‘Behold’ is to see, to hold, to think or be felt. ‘Stream’ is the smaller part of a river. It is also used for something wavy or floating. ‘Issue’ is a subject, concern, problem, number or copy. I think in this quote it means rising. The ‘oak’ is a type of wood and also a tree name. ‘Dazzling’ is something shining or glimmering in your eyes, and lighting is the dazzling here.

‘Blasted stump’ is a blown and horrible base or remain. Shattered’ is something broken, devastated, crushed or traumatized. A ‘singular manner’ is a shocking, extraordinary way. ‘Ribands’ is pieces of material. So in chapter 2 Victor says about how he saw a wave of fire rise from an old tree outside his house. The tree had disappeared as soon as the lightning had struck it and all that remained was the base of the tree. When he visited it the next morning, the tree was crushed in an astonishing way. It was reduced to strips of woods and he had never seen anything like this before.

The enlightenment encouraged people to use science and reason to rid of false ideas and beliefs. After Victor had seen this, a man of great research of natural philosophy was with him and he explained to Victor about electricity and galvanism (electricity produced by chemical action and in biology, galvanism is the contraction of a muscle that is stimulated by an electric current). Victor had never heard of these theories or ideas before about electricity. This was new to him and in future when he made his monster he used electricity from lightning to stimulate the body of movement.

There is a small amount of dread and horror which Shelley has created in this quote. Words like vanishing, disappearing, shattered and splintered give you negative feelings of something happening. This can be the story of Victor when he just finished creating the monster. “As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards issue from our house”. This can be Victor standing at the door when his creation is about to be finished and he saw a new body rising from an old body which stood about 20 yards from him.

And as soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner”. And as soon as the creature was born, Victor disappeared, the tree could be Victor, and nothing remained but the monster. When Victor visited it the next morning, the monster was traumatized and devastated in a shocking way because he was left alone at his birth. It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribands of wood.

I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed” He was not devastated by being created again, but because Victor abandoned him and Victor could not believe he created a new being. This vision which he saw of the lightning could have been a warning to him not to go ahead with his ideas; otherwise there would be danger and consequences. The dream which he had in Chapter 5 after creating the monster, could have been telling him that he is now in danger and he has consequences for creating the monster.

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