Albert Bandura Theory Essay

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Albert Bandura Theory Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 734

  • Pages: 3

Albert Bandura Theory

Albert Bandura’s theory (The Bobo Doll Experiment) states that children learn aggressive behavior through the media, and by observing others and the environment. He stated that many individuals believed that aggression will produce reinforcements. “These reinforcements can formulate into reduction of tension, gaining financial rewards, or gaining the praise of others, or building self-esteem” (Siegel, 1992, p. 171). Bandura believes that this aggressive like behavior is stemmed from a process called aggressive modeling. I disagree with this theory because there are too many people in the world to base his theory on something that is not even factual. There are many factors when considering a child’s behavior. Does that child have a violent nature? Is that child a natural introvert? These variables play a huge part when considering if a child will respond to violence. An introvert child is a child who is better off being alone (Dictionary.com).

They shelter within themselves. They draw energy and confidence from being alone and staying to themselves. A child like this tends to shy away from groups and group activities. Often times, violent crimes and aggressive behavior are spawned by a group or gang of likeminded people. Introverted children will more than likely not be involved with such gathering of behavior. According to an article, Children and TV Violence, Sarah Davis (2010) indicated that “While some children emulate the violence they see on the TV, more introverted children get scared instead” (www.livestrong.com). Sometimes, children just take a natural attraction to violent behavior. It does not necessarily have anything to do with the upbringing or environmental state. In some cases, the best parents have the worst children.

No one is responsible for the outcome of that child’s behavior but the child itself. The child is the only beholder of what they decide to become in the future. For example, I know a set of twin boys who were both brought up in the same household. They attended the same school and were exposed to the same environment. Yet, the younger twin led a life of aggressive behavior and made a career of being out of being a criminal. However, the older twin chose a path of positivity.

He graduated from high school and went to college. He also recently got engaged and is now working on a career in Business. However, his brother is currently serving a sentence for burglary and aggravated assault with the intent to do bodily harm. This simple comparison with these twin boys is called the Classical Choice Theory. The Classical Choice Theory has evolved into modern rational choice theory, which argues that criminals are rational decision makers: before choosing to commit crimes, criminals evaluate the benefits and costs of the contemplate criminal act; their choice is structured by the fear of punishment (Siegel, 2011, p. 13).

This theory states that criminals or children who commit crimes have the rational choice to commit crimes without any influence of their environment, other people or the media. Others might not agree with me on the Albert Bandura Theory, stating that the media, other people and the environment are some reasons for negative behavior of a child. Parenting a child is not a science; it cannot be put into a scientific method and used to rear and develop a child. However, each child is different; therefore, each technique has to be executed accordingly to a child’s behavior. Unfortunately, some children live in low income societies and are exposed to violence. Nevertheless, if you rear a child with the proper guidance, that child still withholds his future in his hands. Each child has the ultimate say-so of what they will or will not do when it is time for them to make that dangerous choice.

References

(N/A) (N/D) Introvert Retrieved on July 31, 2012
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/introvert?s=t

Davis, S.(2010). Children and tv violence. Retrieved August 6,2012, from http://www.livestrong.com/article/75671-children-tv-violence/#ixzz22mr0G2ui

Rathus A. Spencer (2012). Psych. 51. Mason, Ohio: Wadsworth. Cengage
Learning. Siegal, L. J. (2011). Criminology: The core (4th ed.). Florence, KY: Wadsworth Publishing.

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