A rose for Emily Essay

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A rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 340

  • Pages: 1

A rose for Emily

In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” the focus is on Miss Emily and her Southern upbringing. In the South during Miss Emily’s life time for a woman not to be married was socially unacceptable. In Southern society during this time, and even today, it was encouraged and believed that to be happy it was necessary for one to be married. Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” is a classic example of Southern literature because of the importance of family, community, religion, time and place. Miss Emily represented the importance of all of these things on Southern society. Miss Emily, is forced to conform to her father’s Southern societal values. Her family represented a monument of the past; Emily was referred to as a “fallen monument.”. She was a relic of Southern gentility and past values. She was considered fallen because she had been proven susceptible to death and decay. Like the rest of the world Miss Emily’s father chased away any and all men that tried and wanted to marry her. Miss Emily was very controlled by her father. He was very protective of her and extremely dominating. This kind of family environment for women was typical of southern society. Miss Emily herself represented, “a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation”. Miss Emily was merely a product of her environment. William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” displays an ideal of the antebellum Southern society that is often still associated with the south. Faulkner succeeded in writing a work of Southern literature that displays a romantic pull of the past and the idea that submission to this romance was a form of death thematically, death conquers all. The story of Miss Emily Grierson from Yaknapatawpha County is a tale depicting the romance of the South combined with the story itself created a captivating atmosphere, a world where no one wants.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1949

  • Pages: 8

A Rose for Emily

The short story begins by telling the end of it; the story begins with the funeral of the aristocratic Miss Emily Grierson during the time period of the civil war. The funeral turnout so big, the whole town of Jefferson attended. The town felt responsible for Miss Emily because they felt that she was a “tradition, a duty and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town” (287). “The men of the town respected Miss Grierson and viewed her as a fallen monument” (287), whereas the women of the town haven’t been in the house for years and was viewed by the narrator to have attended the funeral just to get a peek of the inside of Emily’s home to see how she lived.

The house sits on a street that was once the town’s most prestigious areas. With all the other homes replaced with garages and cotton gins Miss Grierson’s house was the last one standing. The house was described as “a big, squarrish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies, set on what had once been our most select street” (287). Now, time has taken toll, and neglect of the maintenance has distorted its once beautiful structure. The main conflict in the story was Emily facing reality, she didn’t know how to let go of her past “I have no taxes in Jefferson. Colonel Sartoris explained it to me. Perhaps one of you can gain access to the city records and satisfy yourselves” (288). Agitated by her tactics, the town is getting tired of taking care of her, “So the next day, “She will kill herself”; and we said it would be the best thing” (291). The townspeople think she is stuck up and arrogant because she thinks that everything revolves around her. Isolation from the society caused her to become depressed, unhappy and crazy, leading up to her destroying Homer.

Emily was a heavy set woman “She looked bloated, like a body long submerged in motionless water and of that pallid hue” (288). She was an old, secretive woman, who was devastated and alone in a growing society, forcing her to stay in her role. Emily sunk into a deep mental depression and limited others to see her true identity by remaining hidden, “When we next saw Miss Emily, she had grown fat and her hair was turning gray” (292). She lived most of her life in isolation and was intimidated by her controlling father. When Miss Emily was alive, the townspeople considered her as a financial obligation because she never paid taxes. She hadn’t paid in years, and she wasn’t forced to pay “See Colonel Sartoris, I have no taxes in Jefferson” (288).

Her nonpayment dated back to 1894 when the mayor of the town, Mayor Colonel Sartoris, told the story that her father loaned the town money and as payment back to her father they allowed her not to pay taxes. Her father died and left Miss Emily with no money to live off of and the inheritance of a decaying house. As time passed and generations came and went, the arrangement became a discontent with the people so they made many attempts to collect the long time debt but as adamant as they were, so was Emily. She would not respond to their efforts. Finally after numerous failed notifications, the town’s board decided to make a trip to her house hoping to get an agreement to satisfy the debt. Emily hadn’t had visitors in years, but greeted by her old house servant, the board was permitted to enter into the damp stenched home and waited in the room until Miss Grierson was summoned.

When Emily enters; small, round and dressed in black, not nearly as appealing as she was once described, the visitors affirmed their purpose. They requested compensation for her taxes, but Emily’s harsh and bold demanded that she didn’t have taxes and instructed Tobe, her house servant, to escort them out, “I have no taxes in Jefferson. Tobe!” The Negro appeared. “Show these gentlemen out.” (288). Emily always wanted a home where she can feel loved and free in, but it didn’t turn out that way as the complaints poured in from neighbors and townspeople about a smell lingering around the home and demanded the new mayor to take action. Judge Stevens, old in his years, didn’t know what he could do to fix the problem.

He thought the smell might have been a dead rodent that the caretaker must have killed in the yard, “It’s probably just a snake or a rat that nigger of hers killed in the yard” (289). To quiet down the complaints, he said he would send the message to Ms. Emily’s servant. As more complaints came in and the problem persisted, a group of men decided to take matters into their own hands and made a visit to Miss Emily’s house, “They broke open the cellular door and sprinkled lime there, and in all the out buildings” (289). After some time, the smell went away.

During her younger years, people felt bad for Miss Emily. Her great-aunt old lady Wyatt had gone mad and her father sheltered her so much that he didn’t allow her too far from his sight. He drove everyone away. He felt that there was no young man good enough for his Emily, so she never married and didn’t have any friends. The Griersons believed they were a higher class than most. Emily didn’t have a relationship with her family in Alabama because her father had a fallen out with them over Aunt Wyatt’s property. When Mr. Grierson died, Emily denied he was dead and left him in the house for three days. After many failed attempts by the townspeople to persuade her to get rid of his decomposing body, she let go and buried her father. Now she was all alone and didn’t come out much. Time passed and it was a long time before anyone had seen Emily, “When we saw her again, her hair was cut short, making her look like a girl with a vague resemblance to those angels in colored church windows” (290). Emily’s new look made her seem younger.

After Emily’s father’s death, the town paid a construction company to pave the sidewalks. The foreman, Homer Barron, was from up north and grew to know the townspeople. He was “a big dark, ready men, with a big voice and eyes lighter than his face” (290). Homer was Emily’s secret lover, “Miss Emily and her lover Homer Barron, had been carrying on for the better part of two years” (Scherting398), whether that meant he was dead or alive. Rumors in the town said Homer would not get married, “Homer himself had remarked-he liked men, and it was known that he drank with the younger men in the Elks Club-that he was not a marrying man” (291). When Emily requested arsenic from the druggist, the town started to become curious whether she was going to kill herself or not, “I want some poison,” she said to the druggist” (290). Little did they know that it was for Homer, “Emily feels so disillusioned and desperate that she manages to poison him, feeling that in this way she can keep him forever with her” (Yang 73).

People often saw Homer and Emily together on Sunday afternoons driving in a buggy. Some of the town’s ladies weren’t too pleased with the sight. As Homer and Miss Emily spent more time together, the ladies thought it was a dishonor to the town and a terrible example to the young folks so they reached out to her family in Alabama to see if they can come and stay with her. During the cousins stay, Emily went to the store and bought jewelry, a toilet set, men’s clothing and a nightshirt. They were thought to surely be married now with Emily preparing for his stay, but while the cousins were at the house, Homer left. Soon after her relatives left Homer returned. After his last sighting entering Miss Emily’s house, Homer was never seen again as well as Miss Emily, but from time to time she would be seen by her window. People thought Miss Grierson went crazy. It was years before she would be seen again, “When we next saw Miss Emily, she had grown fat and her hair was turning gray” (292). Emily got ill and died downstairs in one of the rooms.

The funeral was held days after Miss Emily’s death. Her family and the townspeople came to make their final view. Ladies all about, men in their confederate uniforms, on the porch and in the yard, they waited after Emily was buried before they went in the room that hadn’t been visited in decades. When the door was broken down, dust filled the room. Inside, it looked like a preparation for a wedding; decorated with faded rose color curtains and lights. Across the room stood a dressing table with crystal set in row and a man’s tarnished, silver toilet set. There also rest a collar and tie. Hanging on a chair, a suit cautiously folded and accompanied by some shoes and socks. To the spectators surprise, lying amongst everything rest Homer. Underneath his nightshirt, his body was molded to fit an embrace. Imprinted on a pillow next to his decayed remains; caressed by time, laid an indentation of a head. In the crest of the indentation rest a single long, gray strand of hair from Miss Emily head.

It was not until her final day of death that the readers could fully picture Emily as being insane. Having being denied male companionship by her father, she was desperate for love. She was so crazy that she killed the man she loved and used her aristocratic position to cover up the murder. By killing Homer, she didn’t realize that she was sentencing herself to total isolation, no contact with anything or anyone from the outside world. The narrator persuaded the reader to believe that Emily killed Homer and then preserved his body in the moment of her most anticipated day. To her, she sealed her love, preventing the stroke of loneliness. Always being comforted by his touch, she laid with him until she became ill and overcome by death.

Work Cited

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on A Rose for Emily.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2007. Web. 14 Mar. 2013

Dliworth, Thomas. “A Romance to Kill For: Homocidal Complicity in Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily.” Studies in Short Fiction 361999 251-62. 21 Nov 2008.

Yagcioglu, Semiramis. “Language, Subjectivity and Ideology in “A Rose for Emily”.” Journal of American Studies of Turkey 2(1995) 49-59. 21 Nov 2008.

Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily.” In The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Nina Baym. 2160-2166. New York: W.W. Norton, 2003.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 497

  • Pages: 2

A Rose for Emily

Foreshadowing is an advance sign or warning of what is to come in the future. Foreshadowing is used as a literary device to tease readers about plot turns that will occur later in the story. In the story, “A Rose for Emily,” by William Faulkner, several examples are used to achieve the surprising but believable ending. The extremely strong scent about Ms. Emily’s house and the purchase of the poison are just what of these examples of foreshadowing in this story. The first example of foreshadowing is the horrible stench that the townspeople complain about.

In the quote, “just as if a man – any man- could keep a kitchen properly,” it shows how the women accuse the male servant of the smell because they stereotype how bad men are in the kitchen since it isn’t their place. Anthor accusation of the smell from the butler is Judge Steven when he states “ its probably just a snake or rat that nigger of hers killed in the yard.” These two quotes suggest the smell to be from the butler but kept us on the edge of what the smell really was. The townspeople tried to resolve the issue, as some of the men decided to sprinkle lime around her house in hopes it would alleviate the stench. However, the smell did not dissipate for another week or two. If the odor had come from a mere snake or rat, the smell would have persisted for only a few days. In anthor section of the story Emily plans on buying arsenic.

This is the next example of foreshadowing. “I want the best you have. I don’t care what kind,” this quote made by Emily to the town druggist when she wants the strongest poison. This questions the reader what she might need it for and why the strongest one. The druggist answers back to her, “they’ll kill anything up to an elephant,” the druggist made this point to let Miss Emily know that it kills huge animals not only just rats. When Emily goes home she finds written on the box, under the skull and cross bones- “ for rats,” this suggest to the reader to think whether she might use it on herself or for someone else. Therefore in the ending of the story, when Miss Emily dies and the townspeople discover the corpse of Homer Barron, the reader recalls the use of foreshadowing, Miss Emily buying the poison and the horrible stench that was coming from the house. Faulkner in fact prepares the reader for Homer Barron’s death at the hands of Miss Emily almost from the very beginning. The use of foreshadowing throughout the story contributes to the unity of the story and allows the reader to accept

the lovers’ fate as inevitable.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1298

  • Pages: 5

A Rose for Emily

It was a conservative at that time. According to the plot in this story we can tell” Dammit, sir, will you accuse a lady to her face of smelling bad? ”(The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 393) On regular cases, it was impossible that our neighbor be affordable to such stinky smell and not to tell us. We can figure out that the villager in the town was respectful to Emily and her family so they don’t want to annoy Emily. However, they sometimes also felt pity for Emily’s situation and even a kind of contempt.

After her father passed away, her father left nothing but house for her. ”Now she too would know the old thrill and old despair of a penny more or less”. ( The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 393) Although villager apparently sympathize for her sadness, they said she can finally realize how tough they were. It is normal that we would admire who is high social status. But sometimes it turns to envy. And we may make ill of someone which called” Sour Grapes”. Of course, a woman lived in mansion, have nice upbringing would becomes everyone’s model.

Nevertheless, her arrogance didn’t win villager’s respect. From many dimension we could probably realize what kind of person Emily is. For example, when authority asked her to pay for the taxes. The officer came to her house. Explained that she have to pay the tax. Yet she didn’t believe what government officer said. ”I received a paper, yes. I have no taxes in Jefferson”. (The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 392) She was confident and firm about her position. She may be the last one who will yield to the world. She definitely alienate from the community.

Because the person gave her promise that Emily didn’t have to pay the tax was old mayor. But mayor have passes away at least for ten years. However; Miss Emily had not any idea about mayor’s death. Mayor no doubt is important figure in town. How could a resident live in these community without knowing any information. Thus, we can said either Emily hadn’t interact with world or she didn’t care about anybody in town. She was such a solitary and autistic old lady. Never expect for others assistance or sympathy.

That may be one reason why the town’s people called her ”poor Emily”. She never cringes, she never begs for sympathy, she refuses to shrink into amiable old maid, she never accepts the community ‘s ordinary judgments or values”. (Cleanth Brooks JR. and Robert Penn Warren. ” An Interpretation of ‘A Rose For Emily’” Understanding Fiction. 2nd edition. New York: Appleton-Century Crofts. 1959. in Inge 25-29) When Emily’s beloved father dead, she didn’t recognize about his death and withdraw into her regret. “After her father’s death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all.

A few of ladies had the temerity to call, but were not received”. (The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 392) She may seems to be a strong and independent. But in some way, she was definitely broke down. She was overwhelmed by her sorrow and tried to get away from the reality. “It is story of Emily’s passage from the normal time-world to a world in which she denied Time, even to the point of ignoring Death”. (Ray B. West JR. “Faulkner’s ‘A Rose For Emily’ “Explicator7 (Oct. 1978) p36-37”)

Emily was too upset to concede his death. Miss Emily met them at the door, dressed as usual and with no trace of grief on her face. She told them that her father was not dead”. (The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 393) In addition, she wanted to cherish the memory of her father in psychological, even his body in physically forever. This idea was obsessed her and turned an old woman into madness. On the ending of this novel which was also the most impressing part. When people get into that unknown and dusty room haven’t be opened for forty years.

Ther were unbelievable to discover a skeleton on the bed which belongs to Homer. “What was left of him, rotted beneath what was left of the night-shirt, had become in extricable from the bed in which he lay”. (The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 397) Every odd plots was being explained by itself. Why do an old lady buy arsenic in drugstore using for and without saying her intention or even angry about druggist poke his nose into this action. It also described why caused that stingy smell after two years of her father’s death. She did that for three days,…….. ,trying to persuade her to let them dispose of the body”. (The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 393) She can’t discriminate the death and live. She tried to keep her father in the house as usual.

The same as Homer’s corpse, she killed him but still lain on the bed with a cold corpse. ”The body had apparently once lain in the attitude of an embrace, but now the long sleep that outlast love”. (The Norton introduction to literature. W. W Norton & Company, Inc. p. 97) “The ending of the story emphasizes the length of time Miss Emily must have slept with her dead lover, necrophilia — an erotic or sexual attraction to corpses”(http://www. cliffsnotes. com/study_guide/literature/faulk ner-short-stories/summary-analysis-a-rose-for-emily/introduction. html). Miss Emily’s necrophilia is a metaphor of her refusal to change. She was not affordable to her beloved man’s leave—her father and lover.

The motivation to murder Homer is that she did not want Homer leaved her after finished his job in town. And her murder of the new order, Homer Barron, is the reverse of what actually happened, the destruction of the old order by new”. (William Van O’Connor “From state of Faulkner Criticism” The Sewanee Review 60. 1(winter 1952) p. 180-185) Character of Emily was the symbol to the past and tradition, such as her china-painting class. But afterward, it was out of fashion, the children in town no longer take her art lesson. This was a metaphor to the generation change. Emily was old time and being deserted by the new era. What makes Emily’s madness? We may say it was her love to her father caused.

Mr. Grierson was strict to her. Do not allow she pursue her love. She may be hurt but still love her father. Her “Electra Complex” was reflected to Homer. Emily lost her father before. When Homer was going to leave, the way to keep him forever was to kill Homer. Both of the memories about two men had mistaken her what is illusion and the real world. To sum up, although when she tried to buy arsenic, everyone speculate she was going to commit suicide. It was a metaphor that what made her crazy is not herself, yet the whole environment in that conservative society and the generation gap.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 733

  • Pages: 3

A Rose for Emily

The Use of Personality Traits to Foreshadow in Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” In William Faulkner’s short story, “A Rose for Emily”, Emily’s reclusiveness, arrogance and old-fashioned attitude demonstrate her refusal to adapt to the present. Throughout the plot, glimpses into Emily’s life and behavior foreshadow the conclusion of the story. The author uses third person voice and a series of flashbacks to illustrate examples of her reclusive behavior, the arrogance that being a Grierson has instilled in her and how her thinking has remained in years gone past.

Although Emily is referred to affectionately as a “fallen monument” by the unnamed townspeople, she is scarcely known and rarely leaves her house. In her younger years she was seen occasionally with Homer Barron, a contractor hired to pave the sidewalks. While Homer was courting her, the two took Sunday drives in public, which set the town abuzz. After his mysterious disappearance, however, Emily goes into full reclusivity.

The town’s politicians are even forced to pay a visit to Emily at home when they finally decide to press the issue of paying property taxes which a Colonel Sartoris had graciously deemed paid in full for the remainder of her life. The Board of Aldermen are briefly admitted into the house and given only a quick glimpse of the woman Emily Grierson has become in old age. Outside of china painting classes Emily gave to the children of some of “Colonel Sartoris’s contemporaries” (page 48) ten years earlier, it was the most anyone had seen of her in some time.

Consequently, when Emily finally passes on, her funeral is attended by a variety of townspeople who are overly curious “to see the inside of her house” (page 43). At this point, Faulkner has foreshadowed the fact that something monumental will be found there. Emily’s arrogance was ripe fodder for her contemporaries. She retained a Negro servant, Tobe, throughout her life in the tradition of her family, but apparently he was just as committed to being a recluse as she and was only seen on market shopping days, speaking little.

Everyone thought the family had always “held themselves a little too high for what they really were” (page 44) and seemed to relish anything Emily did that could make her seem more human. When a horrible smell developed in the house and wafted through the neighborhood it was chalked up to bad housekeeping because “a man…[cannot] keep a kitchen properly” (page 45). This, the townspeople declared, created a “link between the gross, teeming world and the high and mighty Griersons” (page 45).

They wanted an opportunity to feel sorry for Emily and rejoice in the fact that even though her last name was Grierson, she was human after all. Even so, family name carries enough respect that former Confederate soldiers “to whom the past is not a diminishing road” (page 49) feel obliged to attend her funeral service. Emily’s arrogance is what keeps the people of the town interested in the details of her life, and death.

Perhaps because of Emily’s old-fashioned attitude and ideals, she was used to taking matters into her hands and this, too, foreshadows Homer’s Barron end. Although motor cars are a normal sight in town, Emily never bought one and preferred, instead, to ride about with Homer using an old-fashioned horse and buggy. When postal service came to town some years earlier, Emily would have none of it, refusing to allow a mailbox and numbers affixed to her old house.

Anything she needed could be delivered or Tobe was sent out with his market basket on shopping day to bring it back, bypassing modern convenience. Faulkner uses these vagaries of Emily’s personality to foreshadow the conclusion when the townspeople swarm through the house to reach the upper bedroom which has been closed for 40 years. It is because of her reclusiveness, arrogance and old-fashioned attitude that the strange old lady purchases rat poison, kills her lover and locks him inside a bedroom for many years, not to be discovered until her death.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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  • University/College:
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  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 303

  • Pages: 1

A Rose for Emily

1.The introduction to the lesson says that Faulkner’s “great theme was the American South.” “A Rose for Emily” is a good example of regionalism. Identify two examples of local color from the story. Two examples of a local color from the story are when Emily Grierson didn’t want to go along with the ones who moved into the new area. Emily didn’t pay her taxes for nothing and she had an African American as a slave. In addition to that, she never fixed up or repaired her old eccentric house. Also Ms. Grierson thought of her house as the only house remaining from a neighborhood of homes that was once the best part of town.

2.In the first paragraph Miss Emily is compared to a “fallen monument.” What does his metaphor tell the reader about her social status before she died? Well when I think of a monument I think of a huge, very nicely made statue made in behalf of a very important, prestigious, person in history. So with that being said when Ms. Emily is compared to a “fallen monument” that leads me to believe that she had a very high social status, that of being wealthy and a very important person to the people of the town. 3.Part two begins with a shift in time. At this point in the story, Miss Emily’s father has been dead for two years and the townspeople begin to complain about a suspicious smell. After you have finished reading the story, hypothesize about the cause of the smell. I think the cause of the smell was the rotten carcass of Miss Emily’s father just lingering in the house.

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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 875

  • Pages: 4

A Rose for Emily

Decay is found in numerous parts of “A Rose for Emily”. The image pattern works its way from Emily’s mind to the inside of her lover, Homer Barron’s, resting chamber. In “A Rose for Emily” you find five major elements of decay. The first element of decay that is found in “A Rose for Emily” is the decaying of Emily’s mental state. Emily may have felt trapped because her father wouldn’t allow any male suitors to visit her, so when her father died she likely felt she should trap his body and not bury it as revenge because he wasted her youthful potential for love and an independent life.

Emily’s denial of her father’s death expands the theme of death because she traps herself home unwilling to allow the change of death to affect her lifestyle. Another element of decay that is found in “A Rose for Emily” is after the death of her father Emily allows the house to decay and become an eyesore, as the town’s people described it. Not only did the school look decrepit in a town that was embracing modernization but it also reeked of death and decay as well. Emily didn’t accept the theme of change because she seemed to live comfortably in the decay.

She also wouldn’t accept the town’s people’s wants to modernize how the town looked by putting numbers above her door. Since Emily was living in a standstill in the period in which she grew up in, she never changed the interior of her house so she left all the furniture that was at one time very sophisticated go to waste and decay (Teen Ink). After her father and lover’s death, Emily let the decay continue to take its toll on her life by allowing her physical condition to decay. Emily at one time was one of the most sought after women with her slender body, angelic features, and her white attire.

When she let the decay take over her personal hygiene and physical appearance she had traded in all those great looks for a heavy set figure, her dark eyes, and her grim black attire. When Emily let her physical appearance go she also enhanced the theme of decay and how time changes the body. Not only does the element of decay take over Emily’s mind, house, and body, it also deteriorates her social standing in the town. Town’s people once viewed her as a promising woman who would surely succeed in the future.

Now she was thought of as a crazy suicidal woman (Teen Ink). In her reality Emily remains proud and doesn’t recognize the fact that she has fallen from the aristocratic social status that she once was in before the death of her father. This element of decay helps expand the theme into a fall from a notable social standing or rank of power. The last and major climatic element of decay was after Emily’s funeral the town’s people opened the abandoned room in the middle of the house and found the remnants of her lover in bed.

She had clearly been lying beside Homer Barron’s corpse for thirty years due to the evidence of the long strand of iron gray hair found on the pillow beside his (Faulkner). The decay isn’t just upon poor Homer Barron but is also noted on everything in the room. The town’s people see the effects of decay in the rose colored room with dust blanketing everything and the tarnishing of the monograms on the silver toiletries placed in the room that appeared to be suited for a bridal suite as if it were an eerie dream.

This element of decay enhanced the theme of Emily’s sad tragic life. There is also a surprising twist in this short story that would make any reader curious. The Negro servant, Tobe is the only one to escape the house of decay unscathed. As quoted by Faulkner, “He walked through the house and out the back and was not seen again”. After being trapped into servitude to Emily’s family for the majority of his life, he escapes the house of decay and goes on to live his life free of Emily and all her secrets.

All the present elements of decay in “A Rose for Emily” show that the theme isn’t simply limited to that of change or death but it is very broad and can be interpreted and perceived in many ways according to the reader’s thoughts and views. Faulkner plays the element of sweet, sickening decay in every aspect of this short story to enhance each theme. Emily Grierson’s comfort in decay grew when her father passed and ultimately lead to the demise of her home, her mind, her body, as well as the demise of her lover Homer Barron.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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  • University/College:
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  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1474

  • Pages: 6

A Rose for Emily

In the literature piece of “A Rose for Emily” it’s clear that change is essential in a person’s life. Emily is an example of this based on how she stays in the past throughout the story. She remains the same since her pre-civil war self and Faulkner would agree that the past should stay in the past. The narrator is spoken in third person and he is seen as ghostly since his identity is unknown, from context clues you can assume it’s someone in the town “But the voice of the town is the most ghostlike: pervasive, shape-shifting, haunting. No wonder Miss Emily stayed indoors (Klein).

Time is very important all throughout the short story it’s ”divided into five sections, the first and last section having to do with the present, the now of the narration, with the three middle sections detailing the past”(Davis). In “A Rose For Emily” there are examples of several types of conflict from having to do with Emily’s own self-depression and anxiety, her disconnection from the community, and from characters that are not accepted in her community- Homer Barron and Tobe.

First, a literary term that is seen all throughout miss Emily’s journey is a self vs. elf conflict. In the story chronologically everything arose from the death of her father, which just tore Emily up. She is always yearning for her father and it shows by the way her house stands still just like when her father lived there for example “On a tarnished gilt easel before the fireplace stood a crayon portrait of Miss Emily’s father” (Faulkner 392). Emily has a mental problems that she doesn’t even realize like she is in a fantasy world even though her actions say otherwise she’s irrational and she won’t even pay her taxes.

She never leaves her home and she’s enclosed for 10 years with no fresh air that must suffocate a person physically and mentally. The story is even structured in a way to indicate her lonely ways of life “Faulkner’s structural problem in “A Rose For Emily” demanded that he treat all of Miss Emily’s life and her increasing withdrawal from the community and that by extreme selection he give a unity, a focus to these conflicts” (Watkins 509) She also battles insecurities, fears, and paranoia by suffocating herself as well as her partner Homer Barron.

That was took to an even farther extent when she decided to use arsenic to kill Homer Barron so she wouldn’t loose him like she did her father. She wanted to have full control over what happens to her life and the effects so that is why she decides to seclude herself. She believes that is what’s best when really it’s driving her more insane. The townspeople determined that she went through time as nothing is wrong “Thus she passed from generation to generation—dear.

Inescapable, impervious, tranquil, and perverse” (Faulkner 396). She once was a prestigious individual and the house was example of that but then that all flip-flopped on her once her father died and the community started gossiping about her. Furthermore, another type of conflict seen is person vs. community where Emily has this connection with the old south as the town is evolving and industrializing. The old south was when there was confederate army and when her father was a well-known war hero.

She was exclusive to her town and everyone knew her because of that. Once her father died she felt empty and as if all that aristocracy and pride was swiped from her identity shown by this example “Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town” (Faulkner 391). When her father died she was incapable of paying taxes so Colonel Sartoris stepped up and said her father had loaned money to the town so she did not have to pay taxes.

But then came the new south where Colonel Sartoris had ceased and the next generation was forcing her to pay her taxes but she would refuse saying speak to Colonel Sartoris “When the next generation, with its more modern ideas, became mayors and aldermen, this arrangement created some little dissatisfaction. On the first of the year they mailed her a tax notice. February came, and there was no reply” (Faulkner pg 391).

The new south was a lot more judgmental; judging her for staying inside for so long and judged her relationship with Homer calling it low class and wrong “the ladies began to say that it was a disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young people” (Faulkner 395) leading to them calling miss Emily’s cousins. The ladies of the town were always in Miss Emily’s business “as women they feel as if some sort of biological bond links them to “the last Grierson””. In the new South Emily was being observed by the new generation wondering why she’s stayed in that big house for so long and why she never socializes.

The town is even doubtful of Emily when she is seen buying arsenic they are suspicious by the label to kill rats and thought she was going to kill herself. Also, when they smell the literally deathly, bad odor they sprinkle lime outside her home and inside the cellar instead of confronting her about the issue. Additionally, conflict is also seen through the judged and misguided character Homer Barron. He first came into story when he was working for construction paving the sidewalk for the town. Then the town saw them together many times “… we began to see him and Miss Emily on Sunday afternoons” (Faulkner 394).

Homer Barron is a symbol of freedom, progress, modernity, and change. Since he came from the North there is a mix of classes there instead of just low and high classes seen in Miss Emily’s town. He is a rebellious step to Miss Emily’s life; if her father were alive she would of never pursued him “it goes against traditional southern womanhood, because a pure, holy Southern lady should not have any desire to pursue her happiness” (Faulkner pg 393). Lastly, there is conflict having to do with the character Tobe since he is basically involved in all of miss Emily’s affairs.

He symbolizes slavery and through the story they keep exclaiming that black people are just for service “And so she died. Fell ill in the house filled with dust and shadows, with only a doddering Negro man to wait on her” (Faulkner 396). The town saw black people as the lowest of class “… the mayor— he who fathered the edict that no negro woman should appear on the streets without an apron” (Faulkner pg 391). His name instead of being spelled Toby is spelled “to be” that shows the incoming collision of slavery coming to an end.

Tobe has a loss of voice through the story and is seen unimportant to the people except to serve. When Emily dies Tobe is given freedom where as in the old South he was bound to her family. In conclusion, “A Rose for Emily” can be seen as a great literary work because it can connect with human’s reality and fantasy. Also on human nature to fit in and in a way being an outsider actually makes one go insane and having someone at some point then loosing them can manipulate ones mind to do an act differently then ever. Emily took it way too far by killing her lover Homer Barron instead of letting go.

The story begins and ends with the death of Miss Emily Grierson with the end being the finding of the iron gray silver hair on the pillow; Emily must of went in their many times after the death of Homer and his decaying body exemplifies her wanting of love and someone to be by her side “We saw a long strand of iron-gray hair” (Faulkner 397). Faulkner has the idea that evolution and change in the world through time is good and essential since people and a community can change for the better for example the complete abolition of slavery in Miss Emily’s American South.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1118

  • Pages: 4

A Rose for Emily

A Rose for Emily is a story that deals with a women’s sentimental illness caused by isolation. Emily Grierson looses her moral compass, and her trace of reality, her inability to be loved, her desire to be considered as someone important, was never accomplished. The author shows plans of development; using characterization, symbolism, and setting. This is a very symbolic and animatic story. William Faulkner points out his views of empathy towards Emily in the story when he illustrates that Emily had an emotional abusive upbringing with her father.

In addition, we see the historical fiction and setting which reflects the racist times that was given in the past. A Rose of Emily is also a symbol of a gothic, and horror story. Her abusive relationship, that also suffers betrayal by her father, which gives Emily is a character, in which Faulkner shows us that she becomes more social isolated by the time. She also becomes mentally ill, and her emotional dilemma takes control of everyone that’s around her.

Emily Grierson the Protagonist, labels her as the first speaker of the story is proven to suffer from highly sentimental illness, a very emotionally frustrated character, her desiring aspirations to find love, her fantasy to be loved, and her determination to not be humiliated by Homer Barron (Antagonist), causes her absolute denial in accepting reality, which makes her to do evil deeds throughout the ending of the story. Homer Barron was her only sense of normality, the only individual who was keeping her sane, and alive.

Faulkner gives us a surprise of Emily’s rounded character, for instance, her emotional illness bring us to be astonished of her bazaar and dynamic character behavior as quoted, “What was left of him, rotted beneath what was left of the nightshirt, had become inextricable from the bed in which he lay; and upon him and upon the pillow beside him lay that even coating of the patient and biding dust. Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head.

One of us lifted something from it, and leaning forward, that faint and invisible dust dry and acrid in the nostrils, we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair” (148). Faulkner doesn’t really say that Emily slept with the diseased man, but he gives the hint in the quote above, her emotional illness is more than we have expected. We view the interior monologue of Emily’s mind when she has planned to get the “arsenic” (144), “I want some poison she said (144),” Her sneaky intentions, her emotional motivation to have her only love for herself which was Homer Barron and no one else.

Homer Barron is described as a mafia guy, his cocky, self-loathing personality of wearing a “hat cocked and a cigar in his teeth, with reins and a whip and a yellow glove (145). ” Moment of crisis appears when Homer Barron doesn’t seem to go along with Emily’s plan, his lack of commitment. Her search, and her obsession to be loved, and not be humiliated by the rest of the town made her be a fallen monument. The Rose of Emily is a story with many symbols of a character who suffers from emotional sickness. The rose plays a significant symbol to the story.

However, the symbol of the rose is an enigma or a puzzle to put together. Falkner leaves us with the thought of what the rose can possibly mean. Although, to me the rose symbolizes Emily’s monument slowly falling, in this case her monument would be her lost of self, her lost of touch with the rest of the town. How she slowly becomes more socially disconnected, and is closed in her lonely cocoon. Each roman numeral represents her low level of incompleteness which symbolizes every rose petal depicted, every episode of sorrow and grief.

Emily’s house symbolizes her state of mind, it was once nice, but then turns into the town most “stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps-an eyesore among eyesores (140)” The breakage and liberation of her freedom held much imagery through her hair cut. The poison represented revenge against Homer. The story shows archetypes of her emotional state of denial for example, “she told them that her father was not dead (143)”. She denies her father’s death, when clearly doctors and ministers were trying to persuade her to that she needed to dispose of his body.

This is a great symbolism of her emotional attachment to her father, and how it affected her state of mind. The empathy and sorrow sets the atmosphere of Emily’s fallen monument, her emotional breakage into sadness. The setting of “1894” gives the historical fiction and the enveloping action of the racist times in America, “No Negro woman should appear on the streets without an apron (140)” At this period America still had a racial mind set, and where the rich were treated differently than the poor.

We see the atmosphere of her once upon a time pretty house, described as “squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spices and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies (140). ” In addition, this quote also demonstrates local color fiction of the rural areas in southern America, and Faulkner’s regionalism in these particular places called Yoknapatawpha County, and Oxford, Mississippi. I think this story can be placed in a different time, perhaps like today’s modern society. What are dealing now with racial classes, such as, middle class, rich, or poor is similar to the story timing.

I don’t think America has changed in that aspect. Were still on who’s powerful and whose powerless type game. Besides, as for Emily’s psychiatric illness, a similar story is not that rare anymore, with so many mentally ill individuals today, it is not surprising. The setting in the story shapes up Emily’s abusive upbringing, and gives us sense of connection to her despairing sorrow. Overall, Emily’s desires to be loved were left with an explosive resolution because she was never emotionally satisfied from her father or Homers lack of commitment. Her inability to be loved affected her truly denial to face reality.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1327

  • Pages: 5

A Rose for Emily

“A Rose for Emily,” written by William Faulkner, “Good Country People” by Flannery O’Connor, “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Toni Cade Barbara’s “The Lesson” all share a common theme of isolation. The four stories also share a common thread in each of these short stories is the protagonist’s arrogance and pride leads to their ultimate downfall. The story “A Rose for Emily” is told by an unknown narrator who lives in the town of Jefferson Mississippi. The reader is introduced to the protagonist Emily Grierson through the news of her death.

Emily is the daughter of one of Jefferson’s finest families, when Emily was young she was described as being one of the most beautiful ladies in Jefferson. The Grierson’s as a family are very proud. The narrator gives an example of this in the following line, “People in our town…believed that the Griersons’ held themselves a little too high for what they really were” (Faulkner 3). According to Faulkner the Greisons’ home, in its heyday, was located on one of Jefferson’s “most select street” (Faulkner 1). Emily’s character could be described as dynamic because she changes dramatically throughout the story.

The reader meets Emily as an old, recluse who lives in an dilapidated house her only company a man servant named Toby. As the story progresses the reader starts to find out what the exact circumstances were that caused Emily to become this person. As a young girl Emily led a very sheltered life. Emily met the town ladies at the door in complete denial. She refused to acknowledge that her father was dead. Emily’s financial and emotional lifestyle Groves 2 changed drastically after her father’s passing. “When her father died……. the house was all that was left to her,” Emily was left alone “and a pauper” (Faulkner 3).

The reader can only imagine how her father’s death changed Emily; everything that Emily had known up to that point in her life was about to change. The introduction of the antagonist Homer Barron, a Yankee foreman of the construction company who comes to Jefferson to pave the sidewalks of the town causes Emily to evolve. Emily saw Homer as a way to make a place for herself outside of what her father left to her. It is unclear who pursued whom, but it is clear that Emily was open to Homer’s attentions and most likely welcomed them. The two spent time together taking leisurely Sunday afternoon rides through town.

The town itself also plays the role of antagonist. Emily felt stifled under their constant watch, but she held her head high. Instead of wilting under the town’s scrutiny of her relationship with Homer, Emily Griersons’ pride kicked in. “It was as if she demanded more than ever the recognition of her dignity as the last Grierson; as if it had wanted that touch of earthiness to reaffirm her imperviousness” (Faulkner 4). As time went on the ladies of Jefferson saw Emily’s relationship, or lack of marital commitment with Homer as disgraceful. The ladies persuaded the Baptist minister to visit Emily.

When this intervention failed the wife of the minister took it upon herself to contact Emily’s only living relatives. After a year of courtship Emily came to the realization that Homer would not marry her. Emily made the insane but calculating decision to murder her lover. One could argue that Groves 3 Emily’s pride refused to be taken for a fool and wished to put an end to the town’s gossip and interference in her life. This decision was Emily’s way of taking control. Emily refused to accept that Homer wasn’t interested in her as a wife. Emily did not want to live in a great, big house alone.

She was willing to kill to keep Homer with her. Even while Emily purchased the poison that would eventually be used to kill Homer, Emily’s pride asserted itself. She demanded the best poison from the druggist. “Miss Emily just stared at him, her head tilted back in order to look him eye for eye, until he looked away and went and got the arsenic and wrapped it up” (Faulkner 4). The theme for “A Rose for Emily” is the protagonist unwillingness to accept the reality of losing Homer, who she sees as possibly her last chance to have what her father denied her during his life.

Emily slips into insanity causing her to take the drastic step of murdering her lover. Like Faulkner’s Emily Grierson, Flannery O’Conner’s protagonist Hula from her short story “Good Country people” allowed her pride to cloud her judgment. Hula/Joy was a college educated women who lived alone with her mother on a small farm. Hulga’s mistake was believing that she knew all there was to know. Hulga thought she could see through the nothingness. That is until Hulga met the protagonist of the story Manley Pointer.

She felt a kinship with this young man; Hulga believed that they both suffered from a similar illness. She went with off with him; Hulga thought she was the one with the have the upper hand. The thought never occurred to her that a country boy with no formal education could ever possible cause her harm. Hulga was under the impression that she could seduce and manipulate Manley. Groves 4 By using Hulga’s intelligence and pride against her Manley was able to seduce and humiliate Hulga. Leaving her in a situation where she’d have to beg for help.

Manley got the best of Hulga, he played on her weakness, made her tell him that she loved him, made her take off her leg, and then when Hulga had nothing left to give Manley took the leg and leaving Hulga stranded in the loft. “The Lesson” by Toni Cade Bambara takes place in New York’s inner city. “The Lesson” is set in the 1960s a time where many African-Americans were moving north to escape racism and poverty. In ‘‘The Lesson,’’ Miss Moore recently moved into the narrator’s, Sylvia’s, neighborhood. Miss Moore is different from the other adults in the neighborhood.

She wears her hair in its natural curls, she speaks proper English, everyone calls her by her last name, Ms. Moore has attended college, and she feels it’s her duty to teach the neighborhood kids about the world around them. Sylvia is the antagonist in “The lesson”. The story begins with a group of poor, lower class city kids standing in front of a mailbox, preparing themselves for another day of being taught by Mrs. Moore. Mrs. Moore felt that it was her duty to help underprivileged children learn because she was one of the only women in the neighborhood to earn a college degree.

Miss Moore decides to take a group of children outside of their natural environment to show them how other people living in the same city live. The trip into the city could be described as the antagonist of the story. The idea is to introduce the children to the possibilities that are out there. During the story Miss Moore asks a question about money. “look for the quote” Groves 5 Sylvia’s pride will not allow her to openly acknowledge that she has learned something from Miss Moore’s trip. This is why her character could be described as semi-flat.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of California

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1215

  • Pages: 5

A Rose for Emily

What is not under debate, however, is that the chronology deliberately manipulates and delays the reader’s final judgment of Emily Grierson by altering the evidence. In other words, what the chronology does is as important as when the events actually take place. In the same way, what the title does reveals as much as the debate over what the rose means. The only rose that Emily actually receives (putting aside symbolic roses for the moment) is the rose in the title, which Faulkner as the author gives to her.

Just as the story’s chronology is a masterpiece of subtle insinuations, so also is the title in its implications for the structure of the story. Previous attempts to offer a single explanation for the rose in “A Rose for Emily” highlight how many possibilities exist. In one sense, Homer could be the rose (Fenson and Kritzer). A combination of the rose-colored bedroom and Homer as a dried rose could serve as “a relic of the past” (Weaks 12). Homer’s body could be like a rose pressed between the pages of a book, kept “tucked away in a seldom used, rose colored room which at times can be opened” (Kurtz 40).

In another sense, it might be the narrator offering a rose to Emily: either “as a final tribute” by preserving the secret of Homer’s murder (Nebeker, “Emily’s Rose” 9); or, conversely, the narrator, “unwittingly, offers little more than ‘bought flowers’ in tribute to Miss Emily” by not recognizing the truth until the hair on the pillow is found (Garrison 341). If these various symbols in the story are petals in the rose, it is important to note that the “Rose” of the title gathers all of these references together in a way that moves beyond any one source.

Rather than focusing the interpretation of the rose on any number of internal elements (Homer’s body, Emily’s state of mind, the narrator’s tribute, etc. ), however valid as a piece of the puzzle, the focus should be on the impact of the titular rose itself. The narrator’s ultimately limited understanding of what has been happening weakens the case for the “Rose” being a tribute by the narrator. No critic claims that the narrator knew about the hair on the pillow, even if the narrator (and a significant percentage of the population) knew or guessed about the murder.

The reassessment of the title by the reader (but not by the narrator, who technically does not know the title and remains oblivious to any outside commentary or literary allusions) must include more than a passing thought for the author, whose sleight of hand has brought about the surprise ending. The story is, after all, a literary construct, and it is constructed under the title, or in this case sub rosa: According to legend, the Greek god of silence, Harpocrates, stumbled upon Venus while she was making love with a handsome youth, and Cupid [. . . bribed the god of silence to keep quiet about the affair by giving him the first rose ever created.

This story made the rose the emblem of silence, and since the fifth century B. C. , a rose carved on the ceilings of dining and drawing rooms where European diplomats gathered enjoined all present to observe secrecy about any matter discussed sub rosa, or “under the rose” [. . . ] The rose was also carved over the Roman Catholic confessional as a symbol of silence, and sub rosa became well known [. . . ] as a term for “strict confidence,” “complete secrecy,” or “absolute privacy. (Hendrickson 167–68)

Jack Scherting’s Freudian reading of “A Rose for Emily” uses the sub-rosa concept only to suggest that Emily’s attachment to her father had lasting repercussions: “The Oedipal desires expressed in Emily’s affair with Homer were never recognized by the people of Jefferson, and Emily herself was aware of them only as subconscious longings” (404). On the contrary, the townspeople are extremely sensitive to Emily’s psychological state. When Emily tries to keep her father’s corpse, they “believed that she had to do that.

We remembered all the young men her father had driven away, and we knew that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will” (124). The fact that certain people in town knew that Homer was in the upstairs room argues a similar recognition of Emily’s need to cling to Homer as she had tried to cling to her father: only, this time, they let her keep the body. Whereas Scherting limits the title to expressing Emily’s state of mind with her lover, I would argue that the entire story operates sub rosa to conceal that iron-gray hair on the pillow until after Emily is dead.

Furthermore, Faulkner preserves Emily’s privacy by never allowing the reader, or the narrator, to become a voyeur. When Emily drives the Baptist minister away, we are told that “He would never divulge what happened during that interview” (126): meaning, of course, that the town must have pressed him for details enough times to realize that he would not talk. No one is allowed inside the bedroom until both former occupants are dead, and the full understanding of Emily’s state of mind (despite the inevitability of speculation on the subject) remains known only to Emily and her author.

The religious implications of the sub-rosa concept apply to the story as well. Beyond the numerous secrets kept by various members of the community (from the Baptist minister to Tobe), the concept of the confessional, with the carved rose above it, applies more to the Episcopalian Emily than it does to her Baptist neighbors. Although not all present-day Episcopalians practice extreme unction, the Articles of Religion established by the American branch of the Episcopal (Anglican) church in 1801 include a description of how extreme unction fits into church practice.

Obviously, in Emily’s case, the possibility for a full confession before death exists only with her author, and his knowledge of her actions remains confidential until after her death. Structurally, the Grierson house itself adds both a physical and a figurative frame to the sub-rosa aspect of the story: “It was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies” (119).

The house, described as “lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps” (119), is lmost certainly decorated in places with carved flowers, the rose being a favorite choice among the Victorians. The main secrets in Jefferson take place inside that building, and the most important secret is revealed only after the flowers have been placed on Emily’s grave. The “Rose” of the title extends far beyond any one flower or literary allusion in its implications for the story’s structure. The “Rose” represents secrecy: the confidential relationship between the author and his character, with all of the privileged information withheld.

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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay
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  • University/College:
    University of Chicago

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Words: 1138

  • Pages: 5

A Rose for Emily

It is understandable that the older Falkner was influenced by the history of his family and the region in which they lived . Mississippi marked his sense of humor, his sense of the tragic position of blacks and whites , his keen characterization of usual Southern characters and his timeless themes , one of them being that fiercely intelligent people dwelled behind the facades of good old boys and simpletons.

Faulkners characterizations of Abner Snopes in this story and Miss Emily in ` A Rose for Emily ` the author generate sympathy or each character even though both are guilty of terrible crimes. ”’A Rose for Emily”’ is a short story by the United States, American author William Faulkner first published on April 30, 1930. This story takes place in Faulkner’s fictional city , Jefferson , in his fictional county of Yoknapatawpha County , Mississippi . It was Faulkner’s first short story published in a national magazine.

“A Rose for Emily ” recounts the story of an eccentric spitter, Emily Grierson . An unnamed narrator details the strange circumcisions of Emily’s ife and her odd relationships with her father , who controlled and raped her, and her lover, the Yankee road worker Homo Barron. She is seen buying arsenic , which the townspeople believe she will use to commit Sodomy . After this , Homer Barron is not heard from again , and is assumed to have returned north. Though she does not commit sodomy , the townspeople of Jefferson continue to gossip about her and her eccentricities , citing her family’s history of retardation . She is heard from less and less , and rarely ever leaves her home .

Unbeknownst to the townspeople until her death , hidden in her upstairs room is Homer’s corpse, which she slept with . This explains the horrid stench that emitted from Miss Emily’s house 40 years previously . By finding a single gray hair in the bed , the townspeople discover that Emily had been sleeping with the corpse. Emily was further along in age and set in her ways . She refused to pay her taxes. Ms. Emily was a woman who thought more highly of herself than she should have, the Griersons held themselves.

Meanwhile some of the ladies began to say that it was disgrace to the town and bad example to the people. As now it was Emily character who had really struggled in the story thus she passed from generation to generation at the end I do really feel sympathy on the character of Emily. In and around her townspeople used to insult her. At last Miss Emily died in a dark room On the stairs, at the time they opened it she was lying down with her head on the pillow. It is a pathetic situation for the cousins.

The story was adapted for film in 1982 by Chubby Cinema Company, and has since been released as a 27-minute video. The cast includes Anjelica Huston , John Houseman , John Randolph , John Carradine and Jared Martin. It goes in the same way as the character of Abner Snopes and of Miss Emily. This is the movie which goes slowly as it is and a tragic on to end with the death of Miss Emily. The story opens with Abnernathy Snopes , the father of young Sartoris Snopes , being driven out of town after burning down a neighboring farmer’s barn .

No palpable proof can point to Abner as the culprit , which allows him to evade the usually severe punishment for such a grave crime. The Snopes family is ordered to move along to begin life a new , but Abner Snopes cannot seem to control his pyromania and hatred for society. He is portrayed as a man who , as it is put in older Southern times, does not abide by the law of the land. Consequentially , he moves to exact his revenge and assert his ‘superiority’ at the cost of his current landlord and ristocrat , Major de Spain . Sartoris , his son ( often referred to as ” the boy ” or ” Sarty “), loving his father yet also knowing his father’s intentions, warns Major de Spain of his father’s intentions to burn down his barn and flees out to continue the run to his father. When he hears the fast approach of the horse of “the white man,” Sarty clears the way, of the dark road, for Major de Spain continue on. At approximately the time the boy is unable to continue , the young

Sartoris hears the sound of two gun shots perhaps indicating his father’s murder and potentially that of his older brother , who indeed was his father’s accomplice. However , as Faulkner often does , he makes references to the characters in a later work, revealing that neither the father nor the brother were killed by the gunshots. This deeply disturbs the boy. Profoundly affected by his father’s legacy, the boy does not return to his family but rather continues on with his life alone.

It is understandable that the older Falkner was influenced by the history of his family and the region in which they lived. Mississippi marked his sense of humor, his sense of the tragic position of blacks and whites , his keen characterization of usual Southern characters and his timeless themes, one of them being that fiercely intelligent people dwelled behind the facades of good old boys and simpletons The definitive reason for Faulkner’s change in the spelling of his last name is still unknown .

Some possibilities include adding an “u” to appear more British when entering the Royal Air Force , or so that his name would come across as more aristocratic . He may have also simply kept a misspelling that an early editor had made. He haven’t changed or develop through the course of the Story until the end of the story , after being alone he just passed his way . I haven’t got into a sense to identify with him at any moment. He is not such a bold character he just screamed on seeing the white man coming from the white oor. Until his father passed away he didn’t be alone and its really weird that he thought he is brave and it was proved that he is not so as he just screamed for help. In my views his character is not so as criminal, insane or heroic, he is just a character with all feelings and according to the situation he behaved as he is helpless, he moved on with out looking back. I do have written it brighter as the given material is not so clear to study and up to my strength I worked to make it clear.

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